An end to silly prices on eBay ?

Yes no what you mean knew a shop a few years ago that the owner had a number of such dud cheques on display on the counter and told me all about the problems. The above covers the other ebay scam of people paying over the odds for goods and then a few weeks after the event the writer of the cheque cancels it and ends up with the goods for free.
Chris
Reply to
Chris
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It closes the loop hole of apparently cleared cheques becoming uncleared weeks or months after they have been cashed. One of the many eBay scams that I have heard about.
Chris
Reply to
Chris
Chris said the following on 06/02/2008 19:44:
That scam is not unique to eBay by any means. One of the great urban myths was that once a cheque had cleared, it stayed cleared. The fact that this isn't the case seems to been brought to a wider audience since eBay, but until the new banking rules it had always been the case.
Reply to
Paul Boyd
The problem with buyer ratings is that beyond the basic must have at least zero feedback, a seller cannot choose a buyer. Imagine I have -50 feedback, and set up a snipe for 5 secs to go, or just hit buy it now.
TBH there is not a lot of point in buyer ratings.
I will not send anything sold on ebay such that no sig is needed,
P.
Reply to
Paul Matthews
Paul Matthews said the following on 07/02/2008 10:26:
A seller can choose not to sell though. If I felt really uncomfortable with a buyer's feedback, I might decide to cancel the sale. Assuming there's enough time left to run, a seller may decide to cancel and block a particular bidder. A little red dot is worth a darn sight less than real money! Having said that, I've only ever had one NPB (duly negged), and a handful of buyers that give me the "uh-oh" moment, but all worked out in the end.
What stinks about the new rules is that eBay seem to be totally ignoring the fact that buyers can also scam sellers, and they're virtually removing the ability for sellers to warn others about these dodgy buyers.
Reply to
Paul Boyd
Agreed - I think that is the nub of the issue. There's an article on BBC News web site about this - it's interesting reading, if only to note that the eBay spokesperson claims it's easy to get in touch with them and they will sort it out - cough!
Cheers Richard
Reply to
beamendsltd
beamendsltd said the following on 07/02/2008 13:18:
Splutter!!! The few times I've needed help all I've ever had back is a random automated email that has nothing to do with the question I asked. Dodgy listings have been reported umpteen times by discussion board members, and they stay live until some poor sucker gets conned, then they have the nerve to say that if members report anything dodgy they'll sort it.
You can't even get a phone number for the buggers!
Reply to
Paul Boyd
On a completed auction or BIN, I would be, er, disappointed if a seller failed to complete.
Surely someone really scamming the seller would use a snipe leaving no time for that?
I understand the problem eBay are trying to solve - I have had a couple of transactions where something has been rather badly described (I beleive deliberately) and the seller has made it clear that a neg would be responded to with like.
What I can't see is the realistic solution, other than allowing removal of retalliatory neg.
Reply to
Paul Matthews
Paul Matthews said the following on 07/02/2008 16:58:
Well, yes, so would I with my very good feedback - still at 100% with no neutrals or withdrawn, if that means anything these days. If my feedback was littered with NPB negs or whatever I should expect a seller to not want to sell!
In most cases, but the seller still has the ultimate choice not to sell. A red dot is worth considerably less than real ££££s.
Yes, that is wrong, and no-one has yet come up with an answer. eBay's rule change is not the answer. One solution many people use (not me) is to have separate buying and selling IDs. For a purely buying ID, negatives don't really matter too much, unless a seller decides they don't like you or you get too many too quickly, or your score goes negative! However, most experienced sellers recognise retaliatory feedback for what it is, and ignore it. If ever you do get a retaliatory feedback, then the correct thing to do is to leave a calm & factual follow-up - that weighs a lot with people checking your feedback.
Reply to
Paul Boyd
Sent to me in 2006, never had cause to phone them since then........
"Dear
Further to our conversation, eBay.co.uk would like to invite you to be a part of a new service we are piloting for your eBay ID . From Tuesday April 19th the next time you need assistance from eBay, we'd like to invite you to either call us on 0208 605 3217
The team are there between the hours of 10am and 5pm Monday to Friday to handle any queries you have such as purchasing high priced items to discussing feedback you may have received. They are there to help you so do feel free to contact the team when you need support.
This service is just for members like you who have been invited to participate, so as a part of this invitation to you, we do kindly ask that you don't pass this telephone number to others.
Our team looks forward to assisting you with making the most of your shopping experience on eBay."
Reply to
Badger
I had a case of another seller ripping off my photos to use in their own auction. OK, not a big deal you might say but I complained to Ebay and sent a snotty message to the other seller. I received what looked like an automated soulless reply from Ebay, but the other auction was pulled pretty quickly. Trouble is I don't know which complaint had the desired effect!.
Andrew
Reply to
google
snipped-for-privacy@sheerstock.fsnet.co.uk said the following on 08/02/2008 10:05:
You know one answer to that one? Host the photos on some webspace, then if someone else links to them replace them with something, er, less than advantageous to their sales! (and obviously re-link your own listings). Just once I had the satisfaction of seeing a competitor to one of my auctions have lots of pictures that stated "This seller has stolen someone else's photos. Would you trust a thief?". This guy stole my entire listing, and refused to pull his listing or change his.
Doesn't work if they d/l your photos to their own drives though, but they don't all do that.
I suspect the other seller may have pulled it themselves. Most people that do this don't realise it's naughty, and if told will do something about it. Well, that's my experience, anyway.
Reply to
Paul Boyd

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