Crime or misdemeanour

In 3 directions would be open to the atmosphere and the other falling down the stairs. But soon the loft will be mine ...
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
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"simon" wrote
Why do you need to 'run in' a new loco? I've never, ever done it, and never felt deprived.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
When one has just built a loco using reasonable tolerances the bearing surfaces need "running in" to wear down machining and reamed surface inequalities. 'Modern' model manufacturing processes build in the wear so that bearing surfaces are consistantly loose. :-)
Greg.P. NZ
Reply to
Greg Procter
"simon" wrote
I used to read Iain Rice's pieces, until that is I saw his layout at the MRJ Exhibition at Central Hall, Westminster.
Every single attempt to run a train through a set of points on the layout resulted in a derailment, which did nothing for his credibility in my eyes.
He didn't even see the funny side of things when I suggested he should have stuck to using Peco rather than hand-built points.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
I didn't say I had but she was very useful as Dr Who's assistant. With lips like her's she'd be pretty useful as a sink plunger too :o)
(kim)
Reply to
kim
Yunno, I always fancied that track plan where the train pass through the station three times before arriving back at the same platform as a method of testing locos. Saw it reprinted in a book by Chris Leigh many years ago but never since. Trouble is, it includes 1st radius curves let alone 2nd radius.
(kim)
Reply to
kim
Design your (HO) models properly and they will go around such curves without problems. Then limit such curves to hidden areas. Of course that doesn't apply to loose coupled wagons being shunted. ;-)
Regards, Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg Procter
"Greg Procter" wrote
If you design them to go round such curves Greg, then you have to incorporate an awful lot of 'slop'.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
Hi John, no, I don't design in a lot of slop! rigid 3 axle locos need "slop" in only one axle. rigid 4 axle locos need a small amount in the two middle axles. rigid 5 axle locos need movement in the three middle axles. Bogie locos get side control on the bogie. I use flange back wipers to provide side control of axles with side movement. You won't find any of my locos crabbing down the track!
Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg Procter
Greg Procter said the following on 16/08/2007 09:07:
Not necessarily - I'm building a couple of S&D 7F 2-8-0s at the moment, and the "slop" is in axles 2 and 4. There's nothing to say it has to be the outer axles that are fixed!
Similarly with the 9F which is gradually accumulating - axles 2 and 4 will be fixed, I think (and 3, I suppose, as it has no flanges!)
Reply to
Paul Boyd
I think I rememer that the Australian locomotive - it might have been the standard Garratt - had the leading drivers flangeless. I think I remember that it wasn't too successful :-)
Jim
Reply to
Jim Guthrie
Stanier didn't do too badly once his Swindon shackles had been removed. He rightly insisted on the removal of the GWR style safety valve casing off the first Stanier 2-6-0s. He expressed the view that he had no intention of producing carbon copies of Swindon practice.
Kevin Martin
Reply to
Kevin Martin
The flangeless drivers weren't their only problem.
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The Newport Workshops (Victorian Railways) refused to put their workshop plates on them.
But what about the GWR class that had *no* flanged driving wheels :-)
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Lets see a OO model of one of *them* go round 2nd radius curves ;-)
Kevin Martin
Reply to
Kevin Martin
Jim Guthrie said the following on 16/08/2007 11:26:
That rings a bell. My locos will have all flanges as per prototype, as I'm sure yours do :-)
Reply to
Paul Boyd

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