Liability & responsibility of electrician?

Equipment is designed to operate +/- 10% of the nameplate rating. In the case of taps like what happened here, the taps are supposed to be set by the
electrician to fall within the 10% range. With the taps set at 220v the CNC machine was good to operate from 218v to 242v. As the power installer, it was the electrician's responsibility to verify the voltage coming into the building and adjust the taps on the machine accordingly. He was paid to correctly hook up power to the machine and failed to do so.

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Maybe, maybe not. My thoughts are the equipment was correctly wired, but not set up properly. Was the electrician paid to do the equipment set up/start up too? If not, it is the owners problem. The electrician could have easily looked at the power ratings tag on the equipment and wired it as such. Any adjustments internal to the machine are the responsibility of the person that did the start up on the equipment, which in this case, my guess, was not done. I have been doing commercial HVAC service for 10 years and have yet to see an electrician verify anything past the equipment ratings tag. Look at the tag, shove the proper wires into the terminal block, and slam the door, we are done, next! We come along afterwards and verify incoming voltage, rotation, and set any voltage taps. Greg
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I cannot believe the remarks made by some in Usenet.
Contradict yourself within a single sentence often, idiot?
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On Sun, 05 Jul 2009 10:39:41 -0700, StickThatInYourPipeAndSmokeIt

actually...from a Real World point of view..Greg makes a lot of sense.
Gunner
"Lenin called them "useful idiots," those people living in liberal democracies who by giving moral and material support to a totalitarian ideology in effect were braiding the rope that would hang them. Why people who enjoyed freedom and prosperity worked passionately to destroy both is a fascinating question, one still with us today. Now the useful idiots can be found in the chorus of appeasement, reflexive anti-Americanism, and sentimental idealism trying to inhibit the necessary responses to another freedom-hating ideology, radical Islam"
Bruce C. Thornton, a professor of Classics at American University of Cal State Fresno
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On Sun, 05 Jul 2009 13:52:36 -0700, Gunner Asch

You're an idiot that performs unlicensed works, and thinks it is OK to do so.
Nothing you claim has ANY credence whatsoever.
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On Sun, 05 Jul 2009 15:27:33 -0700, StickThatInYourPipeAndSmokeIt

Unlicensed works? You mean what I do is supposed to be licensed? Cites?

Your denial is noted with utter amusement and gales of laughter.
And utter contempt.
Laugh laugh laugh!
Gunner
"Lenin called them "useful idiots," those people living in liberal democracies who by giving moral and material support to a totalitarian ideology in effect were braiding the rope that would hang them. Why people who enjoyed freedom and prosperity worked passionately to destroy both is a fascinating question, one still with us today. Now the useful idiots can be found in the chorus of appeasement, reflexive anti-Americanism, and sentimental idealism trying to inhibit the necessary responses to another freedom-hating ideology, radical Islam"
Bruce C. Thornton, a professor of Classics at American University of Cal State Fresno
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StickThatInYourPipeAndSmokeIt wrote:

You are in the dark boy..
Our company hires licensed Electricians for basic things when our electrical staff are to busy to perform the job, we have 3 different businesses we use and each one of them do more illegal hack work than you can even imagine. Many times they return to rework after close inspection from the trade associates.
We have some unlicensed electricians that work for us that I put more confidence in than licensed contractors we hire.
We do not allow any contracted electricians to touch our industrial machines.!!!!!!!! out of the 3 businesses we use, none of them have the skill set required. We do have specialist constructors that know the industrial electronics, perform major over hauls and machine installments that work with our guys. Those are the only ones that are allowed to go past an outlet on a wall. And even then, they have some guys that are not licensed but are very qualified.
Knowledge and the willingness to do it correctly is what matters.
Simply speaking, having a license means that you had to know something or some one to get it, and the local government can collect taxes from the licensed workers. The rest is just fill in for the public to justify the need for a license.
If Licenses were only used to signify the qualification of a persons trade, then you'd see a lot fewer licensed electricians out there.
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On Sun, 05 Jul 2009 21:28:25 -0400, Jamie
You're a goddamned retard, boy.

Good for you, dumbfuck.
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wrote:

I'm sorry. Was I drunk or absent the day you were put in charge?
Steve
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wrote:

Have you considered that it is very possible to run the wire to the equipment all to local code, NEC most likely, but the machine itself was not setup to accept what was run to it?? I have equipment in may garage that will run on 208 volt or 240 volt single phase and requires a jumper in the machine to be placed properly depending on what the incoming power is. A sparky could easily run the proper wiring, rated for the voltage and amp draw then walk away. It would be up to me to ensure the jumpers were proper for the supplied voltage. I see this on a daily basis on the job. I would not trust the average electrician to make sure the machine was set up properly! Greg
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When you say "run the wire to it", that means to me that it was attached or as the industry refers to it, terminated at both ends. If that is the case, then the installer is responsible to be sure that both terminations are the right terminations. That includes proper tap selection by the installer of the feed.
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I doubt that HVAC systems have the complexity at the access panel that a multi-phased CNC machine would have.
AC systems have what three tap selections for voltage offset? Oh wait, you are the idiot that says they don't read past the panel tag.
Regardless, people. If you are hooking up a high power requisite device (machine), and it contains multiple power taps for VOLTAGE SELECTION on its termination panel, then the person doing the hooking up is responsible to make sure that he hooked up the right wire to the right terminal. If he does not have the experience in the industry to perform that task, he has no business claiming to be an electrician.
PERIOD!
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wrote:

I guess you don't get out much. A laptop is standard issue for setting up some of the HVAC equipment I deal with. Several VFD's per air handler is common plus computer controls to run it all. One of the last air handlers I set up had 7 VFD's, somewhere around 15 electric motors, and was 16 feet wide, by 12 feet high, and 32 feet long. One after that was a bit less complex, a bit larger, and cost $175,000. Needless to say, I don't do residential!
But, the typical electrician looks at the rating plate, pulls the appropriate wire, then walks away from the equipment. Someone else sets it up. Same when I worked at a CNC shop years back. The machine was delivered, set in place, the electrician ran the wires, and then someone else showed up to set up the machine. The sparky that ran the wires had no clue about the machine, he was there just to run the wires. Greg
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Pretty goddamned stupid. Also pretty stupid to saddle only electricians with that flaw.
Casual behavior in the power industry usually does not go unpunished at some point.
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wrote:

Yes.
No, or maybe. You're making an assumption unjustified by the facts presented.

As described by the OP, he was paid to hook up power to outlets. Verifying that the machine was set for the correct voltage is outside the scope of the electrician's responsibility as described in the original post.
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wrote:

Don't you mean 198 V to 242 V?
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wrote:

Don't you mean 198 V to 242 V?
Why yes I did. Good catch!
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