Mechanical part,I need a search term to find and purchase.

Hi guys, I'm rebuilding my Radial Arm Saw, most the table, but need to purchase the in this picture. What is it called?


Thanks, Mikek
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Table clamp, fence clamp, or workpiece clamp.
The photo looks like the part has some rust on it but is otherwise in good condition. Disassemble, dump the part in some vinegar to loosen the rust, wire brush whatever rust is left, and apply some rust reformer, bluing, or anti-rust coating. There are videos detailing the rust removal and restoration process of various shop machines on YouTube.
Also, this series might be of interest: "Restoring a Radial Arm Saw" <
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-4lg1hYf33k
<
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v
ĚxZJ2We0z4>
<
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v3uHPuc8oR4

More: <
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=radial+arm+saw

--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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On 7/8/2019 8:05 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Yes, that is the good part, the other one is bad, as in, missing the rotating washer on the end. I managed to get find a washer of near similar shape, and then the hole actually shrink to stay on the thumbscrew when I got to match the original shape. Quite a lucky sequence of events. I also found some beam clamps that will make a heavy duty table clamp, if I decide to go that far.
This video and part 2 are well done and did a lot as far as helping me see what I wanted to do as to rebuilding the table.

Thanks, Mikek

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Methinks you'll find that the stock cone washer is somewhat harder than the common flat washer. The idea is to not deform the washer when overtightening the screw. Another possible will be to use the adjusting screw and pad from an adjustable height steel work table: <
https://images.globalindustrial.com/images/275x275/PG83051.jpg
>I also found some beam clamps that will make a heavy duty table clamp,

My father had a Craftsman radial arm saw in the garage during the 1960's. After a few incidents, he decided that I should not be allowed to use it because it was inherently dangerous. It had a rod attached to the motor, with a swivel fork arrangement at the tip, that was intended to prevent the workpiece from flying back into the operators face due to "kickback". It wasn't of much use for crosscut work, but was useful for ripping, where the motor and blade were rotated 90 degrees and the work could not be clamped to the table and the anti-kickback kludge was useless. Kinda like an inverted table saw. After a few board launches, he bought a real table saw. Attaching the optional drill chuck to the motor and trying to use it with a fly cutter turned out to be equally dangerous.
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150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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On 7/9/2019 10:08 AM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Yes, I think you are correct on the new cone deforming, my previous fix was just a piece 1/16" aluminum between the wood and the end of the thumbscrew. It worked fine.

I was on a carpentry forum looking for answers and they had quite a discussion about the dangers of Radial Arm Saws. To the point some said throw it out. I find it a very useful tool, for certain jobs and don't want to give it up. Right now, all I want it for is to cut siding and soffit, I have snips, miter saw, skilsaw, a siding knife and a table saw, but the easiest to use for cutting siding is a Radial arm saw. (blade turned backwards. If I had a sliding miter saw that would be my choice, but I don't.
New information to me!!!! One thing I did learn on the saw forum was that for Radial arm saws you want a Negative hook angle tooth. A positive hook angle tooth is, as they describe it, grabby. Again forceful comments about the correct hook blade.

Mikek
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On 7/9/2019 11:19 AM, amdx wrote:











You all will be relieved to know,:-) my part problem is solved. While talking with a buddy about replacing the tabletop on my RAS, he said I have at tabletop that I took off of my RAS, He has a Craftsman that had a safety recall, Craftsman sent him a new table, table brackets and new blade shield. So, when I picked up the tabletop, he said and look here, he had the brackets with the table clamps I needed, and they were 1/4" not the feeble 3/16" ones I have. Now If I can just get it aligned. Mikek
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