Honda Generators

On Sun, 05 Aug 2012 17:59:22 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"


I've never seen one *WITH* one. If it's not safe for the kiddies on the street, they're closed.
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" snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz" wrote:

Maybe in Alabamaistan or NY, but the newer public buildings in this area are built to be hurricane shelters.
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On Sun, 05 Aug 2012 19:02:18 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

Or Georgia, or Ohio, or Illinois, or Vermont. None. Even the ones with fallout shelters. ;-)
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" snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz" wrote:

I remember schools in Ohio with them. Not big enough to run everything, but big enough for the school to function.
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

The local schools around me are hit/miss on who does have back-up power. The local one did have until they added on to the place.
A couple others nearby have either fixed units or huge portables (ex-military surplus usually)
Some got grants and insurance funding after the floods and added power on as they discovered being a storm shelter doesn't work very well without power.
--
Steve W.

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"Steve W." wrote:

These are the same as those huge Diesel generators they use at Cell towers.
You can see one in this image, to the right side of the roof. It's the yellow rectangle that's parallel to the highway.
http://ecn.dynamic.t0.tiles.virtualearth.net/comp/CompositionHandler/0320212112122230020?mkt=en-us&it=A,G,L&shading=hill&n=z
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Here in the First World the main roads will be clear enough for fire trucks and school buses within two days max. Snow plows and bucket loaders push the fallen trees aside.
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Um, that's my point.
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In PRNY, I've seen zero schools with backup generators. But, then, I've not been near a school in a while.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

^^
Really? I spent a month in a local school during and after a hurricane. Their diesel generator was still running when I left. That's different from an ice storm, but I haven't seen a public school without a large power plant in over 25 years.
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On Mon, 6 Aug 2012 07:16:20 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

That depends on where you are. Some areas have never provided backup power at their schools.
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snipped-for-privacy@jecarter.us wrote in

WHAT does a school HAVE to power,that would justify the cost of a backup generator and fuel supply? maybe the food in the kitchen's freezer/refrigerator? doubtful.
If power goes out,they just send the kids home. that's what happened to me back in the 1960's,in junior high.
OTOH,I went past a local Publix supermarket that had a semi-truck/trailer portable generator supplying power while repairs were being made to something. It seems there's a private company here in Orlando that offers that service. I imagine FEMA and local state emergency departments have similar systems.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
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Someone else mentioned they might need the school as a public shelter. Which makes sense.
The one time there was a daytime power cut, during church services, they cancelled and sent everyone home. We had a baptism scheduled that evening. But, only cold water with the power out. That got delayed.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
WHAT does a school HAVE to power,that would justify the cost of a backup generator and fuel supply? maybe the food in the kitchen's freezer/refrigerator? doubtful.
If power goes out,they just send the kids home. that's what happened to me back in the 1960's,in junior high.
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Jim Yanik wrote:

Like I said in another message, FLORIDA'S newer schools are built as hurricane shelters. Local residents have first choice at staying in one, while travelers have to take their chances. If someone gets stuck somewhere in a motor home because they can't find fuel, chances are that there will be no place to stay.
The school closest to me has had to use theirs several times when the feed to the school was damaged. They can't afford the liability to send them to empty homes. So, they might as well run the generator and keep teaching even if the air conditioning isn't working.

That was 50 years ago, when the buildings were designed for high humidity, and sitting empty all summer. hell, your local news was talking about portable buildings at one Orlando school spending $50,000 a month to air condition them, until they could be moved. If they aren't air conditioned, they will develop black mold. The ceiling tiles will buckle, and the wood trim will warp.
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On 8/6/2012 7:26 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

I didn't see an air conditioned classroom until I attended college. O_o
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

My high school's newest addition was finished in the mid '60s when A/C wasn't common. There is a chat room for that school, and some of the crybabies were whining about 80 degree classrooms when the A/C failed. I gave links and described the conditions after that tornado hit the same building, and that we didn't even have lights, let alone A/C. What was my Jr. High school is now an elementary school, and is surrounded by air conditioning equipment that it didn't have in the '60s.

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On 8/6/2012 8:49 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

Back in the 50's at The Catholic Parochial Gulag, I can remember sitting in the classroom of Sister Godzilla and looking at the high ceilings and transom windows into the hallway and the big steel swing out windows that let a breeze blow through in hot weather, if we were lucky. There were also the hissing radiators for heat in the winter months. Hanging from the ceiling were the standard milk white glass globes housing those big 150 watt clear light bulbs. My encounter with air conditioning was when the whole school was bussed to see a movie in an air conditioned movie theater. Funny the things you remember. ^_^
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

One of the schools I went to was built in the late 1800s, had a bad fire during W.W. I and was pieced back together with available materials. Some of the floors were still in bad shape in the '60s. It had the same high ceilings & lights, that had replaced the kerosene lights. All the wiring was in EMT, run over the concrete walls with handy boxes mounted on the walls where they were easy to run into. This was a public school, one of the oldest in the county. Like most of the older schools, it had a new wing added in the late '50s or early '60s, still before A/C was common.
That school still had an Operadio intercom system, which later became Dukane. Operadio was pained black wrinkle, while Dukane used NEMA gray smooth enamel. Both used the same model & part numbers. Big, bulky steel racks with lots of single pair shielded cable. The early, unjacketed stuff that would rip the skin off your hands and stiff as a board because of the cloth insulation on the inner conductors.
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On 8/6/2012 10:17 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

And tubes, lots of tubes. Don't you just love that old stuff? ^_^
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

I made my living off it for several decades. A 6GH8A retailed for $3.95 through most of the '70s. I bought them by the box of 100 for 39 cents each, on sale. ;-)
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On 8/6/2012 11:19 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

I wonder about availability now, perhaps Russian or Chinese suppliers? O_o
TDD
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