What is it? LV - new

R.H. wrote:


314: Curta Calculator. Made in Lichenstein. This is the smaller of the two sizes which were popular with "Time Speed Distance" sports car rallyists (like SWMBO and me) in the pre-electronic calculator days. I still have mine in the closet. It has a hole in the bottom plate because I built an motor driven cranker for it so that each time a speedometer cable driven microswitch clicked off a hundreth of a mile the Curta got cranked one turn and added in a preset minutes/mph factor to a running total. Varying the car's speed to keep that total matched to a stopwatch kept us right where we should be in time.
312: the mathemetician's answer would be that it represents the infinite series 1/2, 1/4, 1/8 etc.
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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308. Is near to my heart.
I put a copy of the ad I just purchased on eBay at http://hofstadparkhill.com
The two-piece set of gauges was a device marketed by my great grandfather. When his son Robert passed, my brother and I collected several bits from the estate. I purchased all of the bits for these gauges at the estate auction, the firmly entrenched bidder finally gave when he saw the look of determination in my eyes.
I captured several of the patent documents, some of which my son Patrick has set for display. Many of the flyers, some of the tooling he used to manufacture these, and several sets, of several varieties of the gauges.
They clamp on the framing square, what you can't see in the ad, is the gauges are tapered just so, so that where they are set is quite nicely set to the edge of the board. The longer gauge - with an attached tongue was the unique feature. It was a simple scale with numbered marks. If you want a 5-sided figure, you set the mark to "5", and the angle was set. If you wanted an 8-sided figure, you set the mark to "8", etc.
My great grandfather John Parkhill built homes in Rochester. Grand victorian homes with spires, and a variety of architectural features. Dormers, ... I can't name them all.
Years ago in "the wreck" I sent out a couple of copies. I've since disposed of 90% of the units. It was a sad moment, but it was clear that 800lbs of memories wouldn't do anything but sit & rust.
I still use them. They were functional 100 years ago, and today. I even have a couple of the framing squares my great grandfather used. One I passed down to my eldest son. One I hope stays with the family for another century.
R.H. said the following on 3/30/2005 3:23 PM:

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310 appears to be the operative bit of a pencil sharpener.
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R.H. wrote:

I think 311 is a hollow punch for cutting washers from leather- the teeth would give reference marks for the larger punch so that the hole was centered in the washer.
John
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scribbled:

From rec.woodworking
#308 Square gauges - used to put a setting on a carpenter's square (e.g. when laying out stair stringers). Lee Valley has something similar:
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&pA714&cat=1,42936,42944&ap=1
The ones I own are like the ones in the picture (octagonal)
#309 dolly for bodywork?
#311 leather washer punch?
#312 principle of the corbelled arch. Gravity & mass.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html
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308 - pair of markers for a framing square. Handy for laying out stairs, rafter angle cuts, etc.
309 - Auto body dolly?
311 - Leather punch for openings for grommets?
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308. You clamp them to a framing square.
309. Car body shop hammer for tight places.
314. Mechanical calculator. One of my math profs had one.
307. You clamp two of them to a straight edge and get a giant compass.

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Five of the objects have been correctly identified so far:
308. Brass stair/square gauges
309. This one was marked "body iron", as several replies have stated it's for body work on cars, I'm still trying to find one like it on the web.
310. Pencil sharpener
311. Cobbler's/leatherworker's punch
312. There is more overhang in this stack of wood than you could normally get, though with nothing to compare it to I guess it's hard to tell. I'd like to change the question here to: What design feature was used to maximize the horizontal overhang?
313. No correct answers yet, it wasn't made for cutting but was used circa 1890 for another purpose. Thanks to Bill for submitting this one.
314. Curta Mechanical Calculator, thanks to Mark for sending in this photo, and also for the surveyor's double prism optical square, from last week's set.
Rob
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Velcro? It's what I'd use.
--
Patrick Hamlyn posting from Perth, Western Australia
Windsurfing capital of the Southern Hemisphere
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312. Assuming no glue, some sort of fastner was used ...
The center of gravity of all the boards above the top right corner of any individual board is to the left of that point.
Also plausible: An interlocking joint was used.
It is a trick photo and the table is not level, the right side is higher than the left. Or the camera is looking down on the stack.
There is airflow from the right which provides pressure to hold the stack up.
Art
<snip> 312. There is more overhang in this stack of wood than you could normally get, though with nothing to compare it to I guess it's hard to tell. I'd like to change the question here to: What design feature was used to maximize the horizontal overhang?
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One more possibility. The boards are not rectangles. They are triangles with the base to the left and the points to the right.
Art
wrote in message <snip> 312. There is more overhang in this stack of wood than you could normally get, though with nothing to compare it to I guess it's hard to tell. I'd like to change the question here to: What design feature was used to maximize the horizontal overhang?
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Hey ob,
Can we have a little better "size" description for # 313. I first took your description to be an overall measurement, but looking more closely I see no "teeth" in what is apparently the blade, so my thought is that is just the blade that is 3-1/4". True?
Take care.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario. XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

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The overall size of #313 is 3-1/4" and the "blade" (just a very thin piece of blued steel with no teeth) is 1-1/2" long. Probably not much use for this one today, though over 100 years ago it served a useful purpose.
Rob
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Cutter for sealing wax? heat the blade over a candle, cut a thin slice from the stick and apply to the document and while it is still soft, imprint it with the owners mark. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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I'm thinking it's some sort of harness-maker's tool, but that's a WAG.
--
"The thing about saying the wrong words is that A, I don't notice it, and B,
sometimes orange water gibbon bucket and plastic." -- Mr. Burrows
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Nope, it's something that was used around the house.
Rob
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On 2-Apr-2005, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Cheese cutter?
Mike
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It's not used as a cutter.
Rob
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wrote:

Or maybe for trimming up used candles?
Rhiannon
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This one wasn't used on candles.
Rob
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