Camera Mounts....???

I'm looking to design a small payload section for my video camera. We just bought the boostervision mini-cam/transmitter and I'd prefer to
have the camera shock mounted inside the section, most likely with the lens pointed towards the rear.
What's the current trend in regards to these smaller video cameras? Tried and true methods that work.
Thanks...!!!
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When I build my camera bays, I add a plywood 'shroud' that both holds the camera in place and points it downwards along the airframe. Basically, it's a thick, hollow 'fin' that covers the hole the camera slides into.

Haven't tried those yet. My current project is a point-and-shoot digital camera for taking video of the flight.
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Steward wrote:

to
the
One thing I did was attach a thin sheet of plastic (or thin plywood) to the transmitter package, which extends far enough to protect the connecters at each end. The the whole thing sets into the rocket between two bulkheads. This prevents shifting during flight and keeps the connecters from being bent or damaged due to high G's.
I don't have any construction pics of my BV payloads, but I'll try to post some pretty soon.
'
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Hi Steward,
these two camera pods have been added to rockets and produced most all the videos we have. the simple black pod is simply BT-55 with a bt-55 nose cone.
http://www.boostervision.com/images/hitchhiker.jpg
this has produced 90% of all our videos we have in stock here at the shop.
believe it or not, the unit has been black taped to most rockets, but was ducked taped to a L800 5" rocket.
the larger transmiter we have has a seperate transmitter mounted in the ebay, but we just screwed the camera head to the side of the ebay ring for the breath taking bruiser videos:
http://www.boostervision.com/images/bv3gcamins.jpg
Some like to mount the mini cam in a shroud like this to make it more pro looking and that works well for them as well
http://www.boostervision.com/boostervision/default_files/LargeRocketCam.jpg
Art Upton K8XG BoosterVision.com

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Can you put two or more cameras on a single rocket?
--
Jerry Irvine, Box 1242, Claremont, California 91711 USA
Opinion, the whole thing. <mail to: snipped-for-privacy@gte.net>
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yes with care of different TX frequencies, and you also need two or more receivers on the ground.
it has been done.
ArtU
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I've been thinking about a foam sphere probably incased in a wire frame. If I get that far, then suspending it inside the airframe would be the easy part. Rubber bands or elastic. My goal is to isolate the camera from any external vibration of the airframe. A fellow club member and I have considered dual cameras... that would be cool. Steward
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I don't know how that would work, exactly... but you have to be sure to keep it solid enough that the lens won't move out of the opening in your airframe. Otherwise, you'll just get pictures of the inside of your rocket. ;-)

It *really* helps keep the rocket more-or-less on a vertical flightpath.
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Steward wrote:

the
What are you flying, that you expect to have that much vibration? Out of hundreds of camera payload flights, I don't think I've had any that had noticeable issues involving vibration of the airframe.
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Hi Steward.
that wire and foam will attenuate the miccrowave signal from the mini GearCam and reduce your range greatly, even with the 14db antenna.
I have never seen the need to isolate the camera from the airframe in model or HPR sized rockets yet.
That mini GearCam has gone though Mach even, just riding on the outside of the rocket.
due to the small size of the transmitting antenna on the body of the camera, you need the body very close to if not outside off the airframe to get horizontal polarized signal to the ground for the 14db patch antenna to pick up.
Dual cameras sounds really, relly kewl !
Keep me in the loop.
Art Upton K8XG BoosterVision.com BoosterWorks.com CowboyRocketry.com GearCam.com
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Thanks Mr Upton... I guess that's what I needed to hear... I've always gone overboard when it comes to small things (more than I should I guess), and I guess that shows, as my point of the thread. I've just retired from broadcasting (after 30yrs) and have always isolated cameras (as well as microphones) to aquire a more stable image... when you know that vibration might be a problem. That, and I love to tinker with things...!!! I appreaceate your input especially when it reminds me that sometimes simplicity is usually the best way.
Thanks again... Steward
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