Where in Canada will LDRS 2005 be?

Does anyone know where in Canada LDRS 2005 is being planned for? I google
searched this group, but didn't find anything specifying where LDRS might
actually be held in Canada.
I thought I heard it would be held at Roc Lake, but Leathbridge Rocketry
is not currently a member of Tripoli.
Yes, I like to plan far in advance.
Brian Elfert
Reply to
Brian Elfert
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Brian Yes, it will be held at Roc Lake near Lethbridge, Alberta. Lethbridge Rocketry is not a member of Tripoli, but Tripoli Alberta is, and it is Tripoli Alberta who will be organizing the launch--- with help from Lethbridge, Calgary, Edmonton and others
See you in 2005
Max Baines
Reply to
Max Baines
Yeah, but how do us Americans get our motors into the country? I know Mark Simpson always had to make arrangements to drive thru Canada to/from NYPower and Michigan.
George
Reply to
George Ball
George,
It was correct to not define, which country, which was fortunate. Canada is a lot less restrictive that the US. When it happens, you'll be able to get them to Canada without much more than a question or two. Getting them back to the US? That'll be the tough part as you're bringing "explosives" into the good old USA. I hope LEUP's work at the US Border as well.
Paul
Reply to
buffalo
Sorry to burst your bubble, but, from Section 148 of the Explosives Regulations, persuant to the Explosives Act of Canada:
TABLE EXPLOSIVES THAT MAY BE IMPORTED WITHOUT AN EXPLOSIVES IMPORTATION PERMIT
=================================================================
Column I Column II
Item Explosive Quantity
-----------------------------------------------------------------
1. safety cartridges except hollow
point handgun ammunition 5,000
2. percussion caps (primers) for
safety cartridges 5,000
3. empty primed cartridge cases 5,000
4. gunpowder (black powder) in
canisters of 500 g or less and
smokeless powder in canisters of
4 000 g or less 8 kg
5. model rocket engines 6
6. pyrotechnic distress signals and any quantity necessary for the
lifesaving devices safe operation of the aircraft,
train, vessel or vehicle in which
they are transported, or for the
safety of the occupants --------------------------------------------------------------------------
Model Rocket engines, as defined in the regulations are those engines containing less than 125g of propellant, and producing less than 160.1NS of total impulse.
Anything other than that requires an importation permit. There's also a special permit (that gets endorsed by a customs agent, I believe) that allows transit of explosives through Canada where Canada is not the final destination.
The Explosives Act here in Canada is very clear on what constitutes an explosive, and what doesn't. None of this pissing around with should APCP be on the "explosives" list or not. ANYTHING that is explosive or pyrotechnic in nature falls under the control of the "act". Period.
What *is* better here is that they don't insist that we all get explosives magazine licenses, provided that we aren't storing huge quantities of the things, and they're for personal consumption.
On the bright side, Max will have a large stock of stuff, and you can pre-order anything you might need. He has also mumbled about negotiating something with ERD and Customs to make this event work better for our USAn friends.
Reply to
Marcus Leech
And since he's got two years to do it, I think he'll be successful. :-)
I just hope work picks up, so I can sock away enough money for the trip...
Reply to
Len Lekx
Brian, I hope that you reconsider. 8000' is plenty enough altitude for me to wreak havoc. There may be a gas-passing FTBOD M flight at next year's LDRS to go along with some other craziness. The Boys in the East know how to adapt to local flying conditions. We have made it an artform to fly draggy, non-flyable objects. ;-)
Mark Simpson NAR 71503 Level II God Bless our peacekeepers
Reply to
Mark Simpson
Mark, If the "storer" in your note below is my dad, he did renew but it was a little late. He received his new permit at the end of June.
George
Reply to
George Ball
Importation is a pain, but purchase on site is not a problem. Be obviously over 18 years old, and you'll be fine. With certain exceptions the transport of goods that would otherwise fall under the TDG (Transport of Dangerous Goods) act for personal use are exempted from the provisions of the TDG act.
The standing waiver will likely be higher than 8000, and if it's anything like regular Roc Lake launches, there will be windows every day (2 or 3 hours) where the ceiling is raised to at least 25,000ft.
The highest flight we had at Roc Lake this year was a hair over 18,000ft.
Reply to
Marcus Leech
I'll e-mail you Inspector Sandy's phone number and you can argue that point with her, OK?
Mark Simpson NAR 71503 Level II God Bless our peacekeepers
Reply to
Mark Simpson
Just save time by pointing to her own orange book for the law stating it. Why should you involve me at all?
Reply to
Jerry Irvine
Is Ed Miller's 3J monocopter considered 'draggy'? ;-) Of course it may be a 2K 1J by then.
Chuck
Reply to
Chuck Rudy
Brian
I will be posting a lot more info as time goes by, which will answer hopefully all your questions, but dealing with the altitude thing, we will be having a standing 12000 foot waiver and about 5 hours a day to 30000. There is a lot of space at Roc Lake, so if it were necessary we could likely arrange something even higher. On the Saturday of Roc Lake we had 7 hours of windows to 30K -- only used 18000 of it but still- it was available
Cheers
Max Baines
Reply to
Max Baines
30K? Now your talking!! We just may consider bringing Aurora if we can figure out how to make the grains on site for the P. At your altitude tho we may have to tie on something draggy to keep her under 30K. Max, do ya have a spare Canadian flag we could tie onto the airframe for some extra drag? I figure that would be a way of showing from us boys from Texas a little appreciation to you folks for offering to put on an LDRS, by flying yore colors, hey?
Pat G
Reply to
Potrocs
I hope your on site grain production does better than the grain made for the cow rocket at LDRS this year.
Brian Elfert
Reply to
Brian Elfert
I don't know what Max has in mind for EX day, but IMO, ERD is unlikely to approve onsite manufacture. In Canada, (with certain exceptions) nobody without an explosives factory license is allowed to make explosives. Period. There's none of the ambiguity in the law that pervades the legal environment in the U.S.
We won't get into the perennial argument about APCP not being an explosive. Up here, just about anything pyrotechnic-ish is an explosive under the law.
I know that Max had said that he'd be working with ERD and Customs to smooth the way for our USAn friends to import their motors for this event. I'm certain that when he has something definitive on this, he'll let everybody know.
Reply to
Marcus Leech

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