Monogram Moves Molds

Well we can't say it wouldn't happen, but Revell Monogram has said
that they will be moving the main office from Morton Grove to
Northbrook (must be close by)they need less room, and the molds are
going to China. All of the manufacturers of cars and just about
everything else are outsourceing and leaving this country, and no one
seems to know why. Well we know why but don't want to admit it. I
don't intend for this to be a diatribe but we've done it to ourselves.
Its just strange when you look at where we can from and then look at
where we are going. Sad.
Mike
Reply to
MQM-107
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Our (MAI) next kit is being done in Hong Kong. Cast resin with decals.
On the other hand we have just made contact with a limited run injection molding company here in the SF Bay Area, so there may be hope yet.
Tom
Reply to
Maiesm72
I agree - we've done it to ourselves, and I'll say it - nobody wants a factory in their backyard (especially in Illinois), and then they complain about not having a job.
Guess what - you can't have it both ways.
Reply to
Rufus
You mean they're motivated by *gasp* _profit_? Damn capitalists.....
Reply to
Al Superczynski
one thing I have noticed in all kits from the reds...dirt in the boxes...hairs UNDER the chrome plating...one time I even found bread( I think) crumbs...dirty greasy fingerprints on everything,inlcuding the decals...I guess the slave labor has to eat on the job...but do they have to be so damn dirty?This never has happened to me on kits from anywhere else,and its (another)reason I dont send communists my nasty capitalist money. so now its down to old kits from ebay and rareplane detective,and tamiya,hasegawa and whoever is left in japan? It's a shame not to keep any american money in america...I guess we can all learn how to say"do you want fries with that?" in Chinese soon...with a Spanish accent,let's not forget...
Reply to
Eyeball2002308
looking forward to those fun instructions written by someone who only speaks Chinese or Japanese and is forced to translate to English.
Craig
Reply to
Craig
An hour west and they're in the middle of a cornfield. They don't need to go to China to find open land. Cheap labor, on the other hand. . .
Reply to
Tom Cervo
I agree mike but china Is the cheapest place to have anything made.probably a very effective cost move by monogram but I wonder how many more U.S. jobs It's gonna take?
Reply to
TONY 70000
guess the >slave labor has to eat on the job...but do they have to be so damn dirty? This never
Sure you did. Now tell me about the Tooth Fairy. Sheesh! Dave
Reply to
Dave Henk
Yeah, I like profit too. What I don't care much for is corporations that export jobs to totalitarian countries and away from our democracy so the relatively few shareholders can get richer and the workers get to go be greeters at Wal Mart at 40% of their previous salary. This process is frighteningly similar to the Boesky/Millikin junk-bond corporate assassinations of ten yers ago. If the jobs go to India, that doesn't bother me--they're a democracy, after a fashion, and the water of prosperity will eventually seek its own level. The Chinese, on the other hand, manipulate every aspect of their economy and politics, from IP rights to computer standards to improper labor practices. There is a cost, just like there's a cost to shopping at Wal Mart. You deal with corrupt organizations or regimes and you will become corrupted too.
Mark Schynert
Reply to
Mark Schynert
I don't much care for the Chinese Communists myself but the more fervently they embrace capitalism the more quickly they'll lose power. They may not realize it yet but they've opened up their very own Pandora's Box.
Reply to
Al Superczynski
Probably true in the long run. However, in the short run, Americans lose jobs so companies can "get access" to China's consumer market. Of course, they "get access" by moving the factory these, with mandated turn-key status, and ultimate ownership (usually after 10 years) going local. American politicians and company execs. call this open trade. This might be true if both countries were equally open to each other's trade, but they are not.
Worse, we aren't even smart enough to keep duty rates on chinese goods, lest we offend them, or slow the migration of American operations to them.
You may have noticed my extreme distaste for the unequal legal/economic/social "trade" in which our countries engage.
Reply to
SamVanga
I'd like to put a 'first-hand knowledge' face on this discussion about how things work in China. I've been there and am doing just that-- having product made in China. I've been to the factory and seen the workers. I've talked with the owner of the factory, who speaks very good English, by the way. What I came away with is this--
What is reported in the press about Chinese labor practices is true. However, what they are not reporting is that it is only true in a minority of cases. For the most part, factories compete for skilled laborers and the larger the factory, the more benefits the workers have access to. It works much like the old "company store" scheme, except in reverse. To keep the laborers from moving on to greener pastures, the factory owners provide what they can in the way of perks. From the smaller factories providing employee break rooms outfitted with TV's, VCR's and DVD Players, along with microwaves and refrigerators, to the larger factories offering low-cost housing, free recreational facilities and at-cost groceries and sundries.
I asked the owner of the factory where I'm having my Mercury kit done what kind of 'hoop-jumping' he had to do to do business with people in the US and his answer was very surprising-- he said the government stays out of his business, excpet when they come to evaluate if he could use more space or not. The government actually helps him expand his facility when he needs it. This isn't in the form of a tax break or credit, its in the form of a new building!
The manufacturing facility itself was very clean, and the workers were far from dressed in rags. A lot of them had a Walkman or a CD player. The people in the painting area were working at stations with forced-air ventilation-- at each station!! You couldn't smell the paint at all!
What I came away with was this-- and I asked the owner of the factory if I was correct in making this conclusion... The government may be Communist, the government places no restrictions on who individuals can do business with. Travel to and from the country is without restriction. And what is really interesting is that they have elections for regional government positions. He confirmed for me that the country is gradually moving toward democracy and definitely embracing capitalism. In his words, he has never been so happy or prosperous before. So, while the basic wage of the people working in these factories may be way, way below what we consider acceptable, every single one of them is very happy to have the job-- and its an 8-10 hour day, unless they WANT to work overtime.
The country may still be Communist in some ways, but when I was there, I didn't see any of them. What I saw is a country rebuilding and people being given opportunities. Does that hurt this country? I'm sure it does. From my perspective, for me to be able to start my business with the money I had, there was no other choice. Making my products in China means I can put a model kit on the shelf that will sell for $65. Making the same thing here, or even in Canada, would make the same kit retail for $150 or more. The cost of my tooling in China will wind up being nearly $70,000 and the cost of running the first 2000 kits will be nearly $20,000. The cost of the tooling alone, if done here, would have exceeded $250,000. How do I know?
I shopped around!
Scott snipped-for-privacy@AOL.com
Reply to
CaptCBoard
Isn't the American way *supposed* to be like that?
Ciao Bonehammer
Reply to
Bonehammer
I think they already have the corruption. OTOH we shouldn't forget that China historically likes to dominate its trade sphere. I fear our dear executives are mindlessly chasing short-term profits and the whole deal will come back to bite us in the end. I take a very dim view of companies sending jobs there.
Bill Banaszak
Reply to
Bill Banaszak
Now THERE'S a name for a model company..."Pandora's Box Models, LLC"...
Reply to
Rufus
I love it. The Bush-Helliburton crowd blame govenmnent regulation for moving their factories, blah blah blah. It's done for the almighty dollar. All we're doing is having a race to the bottom, and the end result will be the US will become just another third world country. Wake up, Scottie. $5.00 /day Chinese workers won't be buying your kits. Hey, there's plenty of blame to go around. Working people flock to Wal-Mart to buy Chinese made junk and then wonder why they lose their jobs. kim m Operation American Freedom-Capture John Ashcroft!
Reply to
Royabulgaf
Seen many A & P grocery stores lately?
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Stores come, stores go. Industries come, industries go. Don't like the capitalist economic system? I understand that Cuba is a socialist paradise that even Wal-Mart hasn't penetrated as yet....
Reply to
Al Superczynski
there is nothing wrong with PROFITS, however this is the "problem" with our "new" 1600's fuedalistic economy...it will get worse.
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Reply to
Yakker
Key word is "yet".
Usually to be gobbled up or replaced by another. There is certainly one variance, though. Gas stations. Ther are 45%+ more cars on the road in the US than there were twenty years ago and 25% fewer gas stations.
The big oil companies bought up contracts of independent stations over the last two decades. Claimed that they would run more efficiently without the middle man and the prices would be lower. Some went that way for awhile, but they closed down a great many.
Federal regulations re the underground tanks had a lot to do with it. The huge environmental mafia push to "cure" the "problem" of leaking underground tanks paid zero attention to the scientific facts that less than 5% actually leaked.
Tom
Reply to
Maiesm72

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