Kubota

A couple of days ago I got an email totally out of the blue from a Belgian
chap who has a Kubota KND3 which he has built into a garden tractor. He must
have been looking at the NG archives as he offered a solution to my starting
problems. His tractor installation includes six metres of heater wire (of
the type normally used for frost protection on water pipes) wrapped around
the head and fuel pipe. Warming the engine with this for ten or fifteen
minutes apparently makes all the difference even in summer. Perhaps I should
try a kettle full of hot water in the hopper
He also sent me the following link:-
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which shows another KND3. Am I right in thinking that this is a very similar
colour to the 'salmonella pink' of my own engine?:-
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Please correct me if I'm wrong as my colour vision is not all that it should
be.
Reply to
Nick H
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Looks as pink as a baby girls bedroom, as pink as a freshly-sliced salmon - and certainly as pink as yours!
Where do they come from? Japan or China?
regards,
Kim Siddorn,
Reply to
J K Siddorn
Kubota is Japanese with associate companies in Indonesia, Thailand and possibly elsewhere which still make a similar product, as do a number of companies in China. It's a style which seems to have died out during the 1950's in Europe, but clearly still going strong in the far east.
Thanks for confirming colour.
Reply to
Nick H
An American company which imports Chinese 'Deutz' style engines and Indian 'Listers':-
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Reply to
Nick H
I thought some might be interested in taking a look at a couple of pictures of a Kubota flywheel spark ignited engine made in about 1946.
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Kubota made engines of this type as early as 1926. This engine has been repainted but is very close to the original. It is 4 hp. and set up as a dual fuel (gasoline/kerosene - petrol/paraffin) engine. The mixer has a chamber for the starting fuel and a lever to switch between this chamber or the main fuel tank. The big end of the connecting rod is lubricated by an external drip oiler that feeds a "slinger" disc with a cupped edge and drilled ports to the bearing. It appears to be well engineered and has been a very good runner for several years.
Regards, Larry Evans
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Reply to
Larry Evans
Rcvd the following from Chris Madely a little while ago:-
"Several of us are putting on a display of Japanese engines at the Ardingly Vintage Vehicle Show on 10-11 July 2004. Would you like to join us?"
Almosts tempted me to to break my non-rallying rule, but not quite! Might be an interesting one to visit though, anyone know what it is like for engines in general?
Reply to
Nick H

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