Nitro? Whaddaya mean?

I've noticed of late that media types seem convinced that we ought to
refer to methanol-burning internal combustion engines as "nitro"
engines. A recent thread posted by someone who came here from R/C cars
uses this term, and it somehow doesn't sit well with me. Am I being
just too damned curmudgeonly, or does the term bother others of you? To
be sure, most of us in the USA use fuel with a bit of nitromethane in
it, but that in no way qualifies the engines as primarily "nitro"
burners..
This seems to me to be another Madison Avenue catch phrase, just as
"turbo" was a few years ago. Everything from vacuum cleaners to
toothpaste got the meaningless word fragment, "turbo" stuck on it. Yes,
vacuum cleaners employ a turbine, as does your Chevy's water pump. Are
these silly ploys due to public ignorance, or to advertiser's mendacity,
or...?
Geoff
Reply to
Geoff Sanders
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"Yes"
Reply to
daytripper
Go have a beer anc chill out. If I got upset at every screwball term or vision I was presented, I would be dead from it!
Reply to
Paul McIntosh
Geoff, I agree with Paul. Don't let the little s**t stress you out so much. Relax, have a brewski, you'll live longer :-). I used to stress about things like that and all it got me was high blood pressure, bifocal glasses, crows feet and grey hair. Or is that just age creaping up on me?
Tom Wales AMA 435536
Reply to
THOMAS WALES
Absolutely right.......there is more to worry about in this life than insignificant details, by the way...this is how to spell CREEPING
Reply to
Gerry Attric
These days there are electrics, gas engines, and nitro engines! The proliferation of gasoline powered engines necessitates a change in our terminology to differentiate.
Reply to
jeboba
I, too, use the word Nitroburners, and refer to power flyers as Nitroheads. I fly primarily gliders, out at a nice, fresh-mown glider field, but when I want to mix it up with my gassie buddies at the power field, it's NITRO TIME! I like the term, it suits the occasion. Lots of noise and blue smoke and gunk on my hands... ooh, yeah! I have a P-51 with retracts that rips up large chunks of sky, trailing exhaust vapor all the way, and it's a fun diversion from the sedate world of thermalling at high altitudes. I may have to find a way to put a 'turbo' on it some day! ;)
Don Bailey Snohomish WA
Reply to
Don Bailey
Yeah, your right. I prefer the term Glo or Glow to refer to methanol burners. Some also use the term gasser to mean non electric, which I prefer to reserve for those that burn gasoline (petrol?)
Ed
Reply to
Ed Smega
Last time I looked my jug of fuel said 30% NITRO go figure why their called nitro powered...
Reply to
rcracer69
Yes they are refered to as nitro engines
Fly it dont worry about what to call it
Reply to
Troy
A rose by any other name still stinks. I don't care what you call it as long as it flies.
Reply to
Black Cloud
Tell your boy to shut up. They're "glo" engines. :)
***Happy New Year***
Bob
Reply to
Bob Adkins
Same things have happened to me... I reckon it's a virus going round. Lots of my friends seem to have caught it as well >:-)
Reg
Reply to
reg
Pretty much as stated not worth the excitement. Personally I prefer Glo There are far to many of the media type and as well as a large number of other's mixing about that through a major fault of their own (i. e. maximum amount of vacuum between their ear's ) that can't separate nitromethane and the nitro that goes boom.
tom
Reply to
Thomas Buehrer
YOUR fuel jug says 30% nitro, but some folks have essentially the same fuel but 0% Nitro - would you call their engine Nitro powered? Ed
rcracer69 wrote:
Reply to
Ed Smega
Let's not forget that the Oklahoma City Bombing was carried out with a "nitro" product - ammonium nitrate, or good old bat poop fertilizer!
I like your point, Tom. My original comment was about how gullible the public is about catchy, but inaccurate prefixes such as "nitro" and "turbo."
The comment about FAI fuel being 0% nitromethane is right to the point! Even engines burning 70% nitromethane still have enough methanol to keep the glow plug lit, and most of us use no more than 30%, the rest being methanol and lubricant. So, again, I ask those of you who think you're running "nitro" engines why you got suckered by advertising hype when we've been much more accurately referring to glow plug ignition engines as "glow" or "glo" engines for longet than most of you have been alive?
Geoff the grumpy old fart who nevertheless took Paul McIntosh's advice and had a cool one last night! ;-)
Reply to
Geoff Sanders
Well Nitro sprang to life in the car world.
Presumably marketing, in the USA, as top fuel drag cars use Nitro(methane)..(from memory)
In my LHS's they call aircraft engines 'glow' and car engines 'nitro' because that is what the customer expects, and the customer is always right...:-)
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Why are you getting all worked up over this? Is your winter so bad that this is all you have to do?
Reply to
Paul McIntosh
Go ahead and tell *me to have a cool one. I dare ya. :)
Bob
Reply to
Bob Adkins
And just to show you how silly the entire thing of "what to call 'em" can go........
"FAI fuel being 0% nitromethane" is equally untrue. What IS true is that there are many FAI events which dictate 0% nitro fuel, but not all of them. Check out F2D: 10% fuel required.
Regards,
Bill Lee
Reply to
Bill Lee

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