Nitro? Whaddaya mean?

Indeed. Wheras an F1 engine of half the capacity redlines at around

18500 RPM and lasts more than 5 seconds...

But thse are not adapted stock engines, they are designed to do the job...

If you look at the specs you have posted, it becomes totally obvious that to get more power, given that these engines are being pumped so full of steroids thay can't deliver any more torque, what is needed is a higher revving engine.

Frm memory a drag engine peaks out around 5000 bhp? On ewhat 7 liters plus super charging?

Turbocharged 1.5 liter F1 engines achieved over 1000 bhp and NO NITRO.. That suggests that with correct design and no nitro at all, 5000 bhp on a blown 5 liter engine should be possible, albeit at somewhere in the

16-18k RPM mark.

No, its true. Top fuel engines are very crude. Development has gone eniterly in the direction of upping torque, rather than allowing them to rev more freely. For a given torque, power goes up as the square of RPM. Now I won;t claim that 19k RPM on that sioze of engine is possible, but certailny at least 50% more RPM should be available, giving double the Bhp for teh same peak cylinder pressures.

Couple an engine like that to a hi tech gearbox and traction control, and you would have a drag car that would simply wipe the floor with anything existing.

Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
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I didn;t say they were stick, but adapoted from.based on stck.

Strange that F1 engines manage about twice the RPM isn't it?

And what limits them is more valve opeartion than piston speeds. Beefier bearings and titanim pistons help a lot of course.

Reply to
The Natural Philosopher

Thanks for the nice info. That made very enjoyable reading.

Glo engines are not chopped liver in the power department.

A hot little glo engine can put out as much as 5 HP per pound of engine weight.

A glo engine scaled up to 500# would (theoretically) produce nearly 3000 HP. Man, that's a scary thought.

Bob

Reply to
Bob Adkins

'Cos we got sidetracked building Beagle 2.... If it hadn't been for that.... >:-)

Reg

Reply to
reg

Hmmm.. the thermodynamic analysis I just ran on 1.71:1 Air/nitromethane at

400psi says the flame temp is 4422 degrees F. It takes real exotics (which nitromethane isn't) to get 7000F flame temperatures. I'll try it on NASA's SP-273 code next to cross check.
Reply to
M Dennett

I'm sure that temperature is just for the very lean condition as the hot mixture hits cool oxygen, although it does seem very high.

Bob

Reply to
Bob Adkins

I know why the Brits don't build television sets, they haven't figured a way to make them leak oil.

My oil bill dr> >

Reply to
w4jle

Because there is sod all money in it and no one is interested.

Reply to
The Natural Philosopher

Reply to
Paintballmavin

Glow plugs work with pure nitro. The 70% limit is to prevent toxic nitric gas fumes. If you reved an engine up with pure nitro to near max power you would need a mask to protect yourself from the fumes. Mixing a small amount of alcohol gets rid of this problem.

Reply to
Sport_Pilot

Reply to
jim breeeyar

There wasn't any money in hairdressers cars either. Just ask who makes most of the Indy car engines...

Reply to
The Natural Philosopher

Engines from the last decade were primarily from Chevrolet, Honda, Toyota, Buick, Infiniti. What's your point?

Reply to
Paul McIntosh

Now find out not who supplied the badges, but where they wre made...

Reply to
The Natural Philosopher

We musn't forget Rolls-Royce. Anyone remember the Merlin?

Ed Cregger

Reply to
Ed Cregger

The Chevrolet (Ilmore), Buick, Infiniti were made in the US. The Honda was made in the UK, I believe (never did well, of course) and the Toyota was made by TRD in Japan.

Reply to
Paul McIntosh

When was the last time a Merlin ran at Indy?

Reply to
Paul McIntosh

Vaguely :-)

Reply to
The Natural Philosopher

Now consider a 2.5cc (.15 cub.inch) CL speed engine. No supercharging, no nitro. Around 2.7HP...well over 1000HP/litre.

Reply to
Brian

Truthfully? I wouldn't know, Paul. I lost interest in racing many years ago.

Ed Cregger

Reply to
Ed Cregger

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