FAA Notification on Large Model Rockets

What is your experience in calling an ATC Tower in your area to tell them
you are launching a model rocket that weighs 20 ounces and has an ounce of
propellant? What do they say or ask?
Reply to
Thomas Koszuta
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I as an ATC ask where are you going to fly? When start/stop times. max altitude expected? and color of chutes used in case I get another UFO reprt from an airplane. and I ask them to please call back when all operations are completed. This helps all parties concerned to be aware of what is going on.
Reply to
nitram578
14 CFR Sec. 101.22 Special provisions for large model rockets.
Persons operating model rockets that use not more than 125 grams of propellant; that are made of paper, wood, or breakable plastic; that contain no substantial metal parts, and that weigh not more than 1,500 grams, including the propellant, need not comply with Sec. 101.23 (b), (c), (g), and (h), provided: (a) That person complies with all provisions of Sec. 101.25; and (b) The operation is not conducted within 5 miles of an airport runway or other landing area unless the information required in Sec. 101.25 is also provided to the manager of that airport.
Sec. 101.25 Notice requirements.
No person may operate an unmanned rocket unless that person gives the following information to the FAA ATC facility nearest to the place of intended operation no less than 24 hours prior to and no more than 48 hours prior to beginning the operation: (a) The names and addresses of the operators; except when there are multiple participants at a single event, the name and address of the person so designated as the event launch coordinator, whose duties include coordination of the required launch data estimates and coordinating the launch event; (b) The estimated number of rockets to be operated; (c) The estimated size and the estimated weight of each rocket; and (d) The estimated highest altitude or flight level to which each rocket will be operated. (e) The location of the operation. (f) The date, time, and duration of the operation. (g) Any other pertinent information requested by the ATC facility.
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Thomas Koszuta wrote:
Reply to
David Schultz
For that weight, you are in the FAR 101.25 Notification requirement section. You need to tell them IN ADVANCE that you are going to launch, and you must provide the information specified in 101.25. You can do so by phone or fax. My ATAC contact preferred fax. It took me a while to find anyone in ATAC that actually had a clue what I was talking about. They are not technically allowed to "deny" your flight if you truely fall into the 101.25 category - it is a notice, not a request for approval. There is no need to call them the day of the launch unless you actually need a waiver, and in fact you can't activate the 101.25 Notice on the day of the launch - that's too late. Calling for the NOTAM, being of operations, and end of operations are only required for a Waiver.
-- David
Reply to
David
Time and location are key points. They like latitude & longitude. Location in reference to a VOR is good too.
Reply to
Phil Stein
To add to this while on the subject, where can one find out who the local ATC tower over their area is?
David
Reply to
Dlogan
I was asked, and had on hand the following....
Latitude and longitude of the launch pin Start time, end time (pad an hours it in case you run into a problem, they'll call if you have to be cut short) The two closest airports, names, distances and direction....including Naval or Air Force facilities
......with all the answers a day early it was no problem. Called the next day to activate the FAR 101 and all was well. The FAA guys are usually very professional to deal with. Unlike some others we have to..........
Chck
Reply to
Chuck Rudy
forgot to say you must also notify the airport manager if you are within 5 miles of the airport....
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this means with 24 hr notice, you could fly 3.3 lb H models all day .......
shockie B)
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Reply to
shockwaveriderz
Unless it is somehow proven that your operation is unsafe. It is possible but I am unsure how that would be done.
Reply to
Greg Cisko
I never made such a call, but as an air traffic controller I answered two. I asked for the distance and direction from the nearest crossroads to better find the site.
Reply to
Steven P. McNicoll
This brings up a flaw in the regulation. The regulation says nothing about control towers, it says "the FAA ATC facility nearest to the place of intended operation". This may or may not be a control tower, and the nearest facility may have no responsibility for the airspace affected by the launch.
Reply to
Steven P. McNicoll
Have to be cut short?
Interesting. You'd think that once given the latitude and longitude of the launch site they'd know what the two closest airports were.
Reply to
Steven P. McNicoll
As you can see, there is WIDE discrepency between what the actual regs require and what rmr folks try to impose on you, often through their political positions at NAR or TRA.
I suggest reading and complying with the regs. You might still be selectively enforced against, and or have false allegations made against you, but at least you will have an affirmative defense to be ignored before you are summarilly punished, often without hearing :)
Reply to
Jerry Irvine
Well, it was said the FAA facility would call if the launch had to be cut short. But the regulation requires only notification, not authorization. I'd say that's a wide discrepancy.
Reply to
Steven P. McNicoll

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