Re: At last - Christmas 2004!

> A noble effort to be sure... but maybe somebody is trying to tell you > that you should build models of jets instead. > > ;^) > > Martin

Yeah! Everybody knows those long nose probes are unbreakable!! :-)

Bill Shuey

Reply to
William H. Shuey
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I can appreciate your relief . Recently finished my first two models in a couple of years (other than for clients). The Gribovskii G.29 (G-11) is one of those aircraft that is so ugly it's cute.

My modeling desk is also used for production of ESM 72. The typewriter and laptop are stowed when modeling. The typewriter gets flipped up to make room for modeling. I put the last touches on the glider and got up to show it to Lynne, bumping the table as I got up. The typewriter came down on the glider and I went through the roof!

It took two days to repair the extensive damage. Replaced the landing gear with metal this time. It looked so good that I built a FAZ AA truck to go with it along with a cargo load and now I'm doing the figures and the rest for a diorama.

At least I overcame AMS.

Tom

William H. Shuey wrote:

Reply to
maiesm72

You may have a point. I have an Emhar FJ-4B Fury kit and a Scarabey MiG-9 to do. No problems there, of course!

Gordon McLaughlin

Reply to
Gordon McLaughlin

I remember your account of the building of the glider. It sounded amazing. It's hardly surprising that you went through the roof.

About 30 years ago, I scratch built a horse-drawn wagon in 1/32 scale and took it to a model club meeting. I put it on top of a small pile of books whilst I went to get my coat. A figure modeller wanted to show someone a picture in one of the books and, although he knew the wagon was on top of the books, he tipped up the pile to get at the one he wanted. The wagon dropped three feet onto a tiled floor. I was never able to repair it satisfactorily and the remains are still somewhere in the house. I was so stunned by shock that I couldn't speak. Just as well.

Gordon McLaughlin

Reply to
Gordon McLaughlin

Typewriter? What's that then??? ;-)

Reply to
Enzo Matrix

FJ-4B? That's a naval Sabre, innit? Aaaaarrrrgggghhhhhhhh!

I'm already desperately fighting off a latent Sabre obsession. I *DO NOT* need more temptation! ;-)

Reply to
Enzo Matrix

prehistoric word processor.

Reply to
e

snipped-for-privacy@some.domain (e)

No no no - That would be the typewritee. A typewriter is just a sort of mechanical pencil thing.

Rob

Reply to
AussieRob

i thought it was a portable wood block printer.

Reply to
e

Then I shouldn't mention that I built 3 of them and used parts of a fourth to convert an F-86 into an FJ-3. Interestingly, I used the set of decals that came in the Merlin kit (the only parts usable) on one of the Emhar kits.

Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.

Reply to
Mad-Modeller

Wot's a prehistoric word? ;-)

Reply to
Enzo Matrix

A device used to process file cards. 7,000+ volume aviation and modeling library all contents cross-referenced on file cards. Eighteen file card drawers. Havn't seen a computer that allows file card use. Is there such a thing?

Tom

Enzo Matrix wrote:

Reply to
maiesm72

Our resident WWI modeler put his latest model, IIRC it was a camel, in the car for the evening meeting after work. Forgot to take it inside at work. When he got into the car to go to the meeting he had a pretty bizzare thing that kind of looked like t was going around a corner but twisted because of the rigging.

This happened years ago and most who saw it still shake their heads in sadness.

Tom

Gord> I remember your account of the building of the glider. It sounded amazing.

Reply to
maiesm72

Oook, ugh, urk.........;)

Reply to
Ron Smith

Yes, it is a naval Sabre derivative. I like the F86 and have a modified Heller model representing a Canadair Sabre in 130 Sn RAF markings and 2nd TAF camouflage. There's another kit in the loft waiting to be made as a late F86F-30 in natural metal finish and USAF markings for the Korean War. An Airfix F86D is also under way and I hope to make a Korean War F86E when I can find a suitable kit. There is no shortage of colour schemes and markings for the Sabre and a nice range of variants. The new F86H kit is a sore temptation if I can afford one.

This is a temptation that you must definitely resist!

Now that I've completed the four Albatros D series scouts, I might get back to the Sabre. On the other hand, I have four kits for the main F84 variants. They would make a change. Alternatively, there are the Meteor kits and conversion parts that I should get around to.

Gord>> You may have a point. I have an Emhar FJ-4B Fury kit

Reply to
Gordon McLaughlin

Aaahh, Yes! I remember a long gone hobby shop where the owner asked for a couple of finished models for display "IN THE STORE". I was assured that he would put them in a display case he had. Somehow, he said it was his wife's fault, two of them ended up in the store window. Store faced the noon day sun and it was July/August time of year. You all can guess the rest.

Bill Shuey

And then there was the Maryland Military Modeller's show many years ago. They had a professional photographer there to photograph winning models for a club publication. One of the winning aircraft was a very nicely done Revell 1/32 scale P-40. He positioned the model under his floodlights and then someone distracted him for some time. The end result looked like one of those aircraft characatures drawn by that artist who does the calendars, wings sagging, fuselage bent, prop blades askew! Really funny in a sad way!

Reply to
William H. Shuey

Ouch! One of my amusing (in retrospect) experiences was my brother and I racing each other to build as many unpainted kits as possible in a herculean effort to show who was the best man. In our efforts, no materials were spared, i.e., more was better. More glue, for example. Arise the brother's Airfix Viggen kit, long nose wheel aristocratically poising over my fine native 2-color Matchbox Exeter its radar dome ...

... out of which then began over a period of days to flow a lava-like mixture of molten grey plastic, which oozed down through Exeter's B turret, taking out part of the bridge structure, and when finally discovered had turned Exeter's forward hull into something resembing the remnants of a magazine explosion.

In retribution, we agreed the Viggen had to suffer. Enter the pellet gun, and an hour of fun. Following which, in line with the theme, we sent Exeter to Valhalla with a funeral pyre fit for, well, most Matchbox kits.

:-)

Reply to
Gernot Hassenpflug

That's what most of my models are like now, displayed in a couple of Hobby shops here in Kyoto. Always a wry smile when I go past there. Only the ships have withstood the sun well.

Reply to
Gernot Hassenpflug

After all that work would you really want to find one that did? ;]

Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.

Who happily paid to have his ancient portable cleaned and repaired 10 years ago.

Reply to
Mad-Modeller

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