Are there high quality DVDs or Videos of Layouts?

Hi again all
Was just wondering if people knew of good quality layout programs that I
could show others in order to help inspire them to take up the hobby......I
am thinking of well shot footage with tips on scenery, weathering etc.
Also, any highly detailed real-life DVDs/videos of steam? Ideally that
include shunting, station activity and lineside details. Finally, if anyone
knows of good footage of Pullmans, that would be brilliant.
Any help much appreciated
Thanks
Steve
(Australia)
Reply to
mindesign
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"mindesign" wrote
CineRail (from Bradford) produce Videos and DVD featuring those two well know layouts 'Tebay' and 'Biggleswade'.
Peco have also featured layouts on a CD-ROM produced each year and usually given away free with the December issues of 'Railway Modeller' and 'Continental Modeller'. Think they've done this for the last three years.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
Allen Keller Productions has a series of US layouts, can't recall whether you Ozzies use PAL or NTSC, anyhow IIRC they're available in both formats.
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Good Hunting!
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
Don't the Model Rail DVD's feature layouts as well as modelling tips?
Cheers, Mick
Reply to
Mick Bryan
Yes... They also released a compilation DVD of layouts only, which featured all the layouts shown in their first 6 or so issues... Have it in the depths of a tea chest, somewhere :)
Cheers Robt P.
Reply to
60106
we run PAL but everything reads NTSC just fine
thanks
Steve
Reply to
mindesign
Thanks everyone - I will try and dig some of these up!
Steve
Reply to
mindesign
PAL for broadcast*, but most TV's and DVD players sold here are multi-format, so it matters little.
Steve Newcastle NSW Aust
*
- unless you are talking SD or HD digital, in which case I dunno.
Reply to
Steve Magee
About the only thing I think you have to worry about is the "regional code" embedded in most commercial movie DVDs and in DVD player software, so that a DVD bought eg in N America won't play on a player sold in Australia or Europe. There's no such restriction on tapes. Keller sells tapes as well as DVDs.
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
In message , Wolf Kirchmeir writes
I had no problem in setting my DVD player to "all regions". It came with clear (typewritten) instructions on how to do it.
Reply to
Jane Sullivan
Sounds like someone added some unofficial operating information. :-)
Could you post the instructions, or e-mail them? If the latter, there's no 'e' in the correct address.
Thanks.
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
It's specific to each brand/model so that would be no good unless you know you have the same as Jane.
Just Google the make/model number of your player and if it can be set to all region you'll almost certainly find it. For example Google "dvd610 all region" came up with
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for Philips DVD machines.
MBQ
Reply to
manatbandq
To find out how search for your make a model On
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Reply to
Trev
It is one real benefit of being an Aussie - region restrictions were deemed prejudicially restrictive here in 1980...... put simply, the Australian courts agreed that legitimately purchased products that were not illegal should be allowed to play on Australian players, therefore all DVD players here either come region free or have the mod instructions clearly outlined.
Not that it made much difference to me before that as I worked out how to mod my first 6 players anyway
:)
Where there's a "don't" there's a way!
Steve
ps. And yes, DVD help is a great site.
Reply to
mindesign
[...]
or e-mail them? If the latter, there's
Thanks, googled, found out my machine can't be reprogrammed this way, but found a nice long lists of a) machines that can be reprogrammed; and b) all-region machines for sale.
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
In message , Wolf Kirchmeir writes
Can you change the region your machine is set to? Is so, what happens if you change it to 99?
Reply to
Jane Sullivan
You had DVD players in 1980, wow!
Keith
Reply to
Keith
[...]
for sale.
As I understand it, a machine that can be set for "all regions" can be set for any region. There are also machines that ignore the region code, and will play any DVD from anywhere.
You can also get software that will ignore or bypass the region and anti-copy codes so that you can play the DVDs on your computer (and make copies of them, too; you can even change encoding format if you like.) Prices are reasonable: the machines cost from around $80US on up, and the software costs from $10 per download on up, depending on what all it can do. Anyhow, I will revisit and restudy several sites, and buy both a new machine and some software in the next few days.
The following is not strictly on topic, but may be of interest.
There are six regions. The aim was and is to prevent people in high-income areas (N. America, Europe) from buying and playing DVDs sold in low-income areas (Asia, Africa.) The entertainment companies price their product as high they think they can get away with. But they have IMO both miscalculated people's willingness to pay, and the value of their product. There is simply too much entertainment product out there. The market is oversaturated. Hence:
a) the proliferation of copying and code-breaking software, which is legal in many jurisdictions, and can be easily downloaded;
b) the developing buyer resistance: for the fourth or fifth year in a row, sales of music are down in Canada and the USA, but this past year there's an interesting twist: the sales of individual tracks via the 'net has not compensated for the drop in sales of CDs: the _overall_ sale of music is down. And no wonder: IMO 99 cents is way too much to pay for a single track of music. Most music isn't worth a nickel IMO. (And I like all kinds of music, I have no favourite style or genre.)
c) a steady drop in DVD prices (20-50% in the last year here), another sign of buyer resistance. Eg, a two-disc set of Les Triplettes de Belleville was priced at $34.95 last year, I go it for $21.95 less 20% the other day. I think that's still on the high side, but I wanted the movie for a Christmas gift. There are also more bare-bones DVDs available: many people have had enough of paying exorbitant prices for "extras" like interviews with stars and directors, etc, which you only watch once, if that.
BTW, I notice that many railroad themed DVDs are priced in the $30-40 range. Way, way too high. I'll keep looking at the VHS tapes for a while longer.
HTH
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
As I understand it, a machine that can be set for "all regions" can play a DVD that is encoded as "all regions". It does *not* play "any" region.
Regardless of anyone's views on the producers' pricing policies, the items you describe are (probably) *illegal* in your country of residence.
I'm pretty sure that the objectives of *this* newsgroup do *not* include the promotion of illegal devices and practices.
Cheers, Steve
Reply to
Steve W
It is my understanding that Australia enacted the provisions of the DMCA with draconian penalties before the act was even law in the USA!
Cheers, Steve
Reply to
Steve W

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