Big Lindberg Japanese submarines coming!

I'm trying to remember... did they surface, put the crew aboard and the roll it off the back of the deck, or put the crew aboard and then submerge under it after releasing the attachment shackles? Interesting photo here:
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what is apparently the effect of the destroyer Monaghan's depth charges on a Type A midget:
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the hull plating into something resembling a waffle iron. That seems to have happened to those one recovered from Sydney harbor also:
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really missed the boat in the details of that cutaway drawing. I found some price info on the models: Retail is $130.00 for I-20 and I-55, although Hobby Surplus Sales is charging $103.99 for them (they're on backorder).
Pat
Reply to
Pat Flannery
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them:
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> 58.5 inches long.
molds:
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> Here's the main website page:
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>
It may be to let the clueless amongst us know that they will have to build it themselves. Heh, for awhile there I could have advertised myself as the 'home of 1500 unassembled model kits'. ;)
Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.
Reply to
Mad-Modeller
Here we go:
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ol' S-boat takes on cranky ol' T-Rex. :-D How many of the oldsters around here remember this:
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your very own two-man midget sub, just like the Japanese Type A and German Seehund! So you wait till the kids are in it, then shut the lights off in the room...then the ping-ping-ping of the destroyer sonar is heard in the darkness....and the first of the cherry bombs is hurled at the sub! Only then do the kids realize you've glued them in with no escape! Then the water starts going down the funnel into the periscope, and the pan of chlorine bleach with the fan over it lets them know that the seawater has reached the batteries and their time is short. It'll read great in the court records of the child custody case, and you'll never have to see the little monsters again! Freedom for only $6.98! :-D
Pat
Reply to
Pat Flannery
Believe me, when you see the thickness of that canopy and the pilot hanging in midair in a non-existent cockpit, you will know that is the least of your problems (although the canopy is actually quite transparent for its thickness). On the upside, it does have pretty petite raised rivet detail and they figured out a way to get the props to counter-rotate via gears. The rivets on the Aurora Pogo could have held a battleship together.
Pat
Reply to
Pat Flannery
this:
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Pat
wow , so many thanx for that pic. I remember as a kid trying to figure out what the sub was made of, and how I could talk my parents into getting me one. never did get one. who did? what was it like?
Craig
Reply to
crw59
They were cardboard.I always wanted one,but I was a kid in the 70s reading my older brothers hand-me-down 60s comics.If I could have figured out how to send the order via time machine...
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Reply to
eyeball
I had this one, and thoroughly enjoyed it:
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control levers were made out of Tinkertoys, and the "Astro-Star Map" was a Mercator projection of the heavens for use in determining latitude and longitude via a sextant.
Pat
Reply to
Pat Flannery
never saw that one live. did want one but... i know collectors have everything, so at least they still exist. wonder if there's a warehouse in joisey full? you've heard the hula hoop myth? supposedly some guy tryed to cash in on the hoop craze and ended up with a warehouse contianing several 100 thousand. if it was true, i suspect that old plastic would turn to dust if touched.
Reply to
someone
Yeah, that's what I'm thinking. Airplanes are hard enough...I'd think subs would be invisible.
Reply to
Rufus

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