ROL NEWS--AeroTech Announces Certification of Three New Reload Kits

AeroTech Announces Certification of Three New Reload Kits
June 22, 2004
Web posted at: 5:40 PM EDT
(ROL Newswire) -- The AeroTech division of RCS Rocket Motor Components
(RCS), Inc. is pleased to announce the certification of three new
Reloadable Motor System (RMS) reload kits by the Tripoli Motor Testing
(TMT) committee. These reloads are the 29mm G79W, 38mm G61W and the 38mm
I600R.
Technical specifications may be found on the AeroTech website at
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The G79W uses two standard grains from the 29mm high power RMS line, and
the G61W uses a single standard 38mm RMS grain. The I600R uses standard
length 38mm Redline grains that have been modified to reduce the motor
output to just under 640 N-sec. The I600R was specifically designed for
use in this year's LDRS 'I-Lite' Bowling Ball loft competition and
produces an initial thrust of over 180 pounds with a duration of just
under 1.1 seconds.
The two 'G' reloads fit new RMS casings that are being introduced
simultaneously by AeroTech and Dr. Rocket/Reloadable Systems. These
cases are compatible with existing 29 & 38mm high power closures. The
G79W is NOT compatible with the 29/40-120 model rocket RMS hardware. The
I600R fits existing 38/720 motor hardware.
The three new reloads are being released in conjunction with LDRS-23,
the annual high power rocket launch sponsored by the Tripoli Rocketry
Association. Limited quantities of G61W and G79W reloads and 29/120 and
38/120 RMS cases will be available from AeroTech dealers attending the
launch. Initial sale of the I600R reloads will be restricted to
participants in the I-Lite Bowling Ball Loft competition.
The G79W and G61W reloads qualify as "model rocket motors" and no user
certification is required, though purchasers must be 18 years of age or
older in compliance with Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC)
regulations. A Level 1 Tripoli or NAR certification is required for
purchase
of the I600R reload.
Source: RCS Rocket Motor Components (RCS), Inc.
Reply to
ROL News
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I600R also sounds like a good 'pre-L2 shakedown' motor for L1 flyers IMO. *Lots* of thrust, but still an I.
-- Niall Oswald ========= UKRA 1345 L0 EARS 1151 MARS
"Gravity assisted pieces of the rocket raining from the sky should be avoided. It is also financially undesirable." -Portland State Aerospace Society
Reply to
Niall Oswald
Yep - and a step in the right direction IMHO. We have too many motors that are a "baby J" or "baby M" or whatever... it's good to see some that are near the top of the impulse range for their "letter" class.
-dave w
Reply to
David Weinshenker
Yeah, but I'm thinking that my L1 rocket should, all being well, be able to take the 5G Pro38 motor, which is just a 'J', for L2 cert. Seems a bit like cheating, but if you can cert L1 with a saucer...!
Unfortunately it doesnt look like we'll be seeing any AT over here in a hurry though. The Pro38 smoky 5G is just over 600 Ns IIRC.
-- Niall Oswald ========= UKRA 1345 L0 EARS 1151 MARS
"Gravity assisted pieces of the rocket raining from the sky should be avoided. It is also financially undesirable." -Portland State Aerospace Society
Reply to
Niall Oswald
Hey, I'd love to see you get your motors certified. Just don't expect everyone to set aside the rules just for you. You want 'em certified, you gotta meet the same standards as every other manufacturer. If you are unable do that, I'm sympathetic. If you're unwilling to do that, well, that's your choice.
Reply to
RayDunakin
You mean the same standards that keep very nearly every manufacturer of solid rocket motors in this country _uninterested_ in offering "certified consumer" motors?
-dave w
Reply to
David Weinshenker
It's a shame these two aren't NAR certified. While reciprocity applies to use, it means they are not usable in NAR contest flying. The F21 has the same problem.
Bob Kaplow NAR # 18L TRA # "Impeach the TRA BoD" >>> To reply, remove the TRABoD!
Reply to
Bob Kaplow
Dave W. wrote:
Name ONE motor manufacturer besides Frank and Jerry who has specifically cited the motor cert requirements as a reason not to produce consumer motors.
BTW, "well, there was this guy who used to make a few motors for his buddies" doesn't count. You said "motor manufacturers", not small time wannabes.
Reply to
RayDunakin
Why not start with those two, and their related customers and contractors (totaling over 5 "manufacturers").
Reply to
Jerry Irvine
What, two isn't enough?
Ray, your attitude sucks AP fumes.
Hobby rocketry is enough of a niche market that we have no freakin' business making a distinction between "small time wannabes" and "manufacturers"... we should be _encouraging_ "small-time" suppliers to come forward with new products - motors as well as books, electronics, rail buttons, or molded plastic hardware for parallel-staged boosters - instead of setting policies intended to keep out those who aren't "legitimate" (i.e., "established" and "corporate") enough.
And don't go bleating about "government requirements" - that's one of the areas in which the orgs could offer help: Imagine if NAR/TRA had an outreach program to assist new manufacturers through the DOT testing process to establish their propellants as "suitable to be shipped safely", instead of simply laying back, arms folded, and saying "go make your own arrangements with DOT and then we'll consider talking to you".
-dave w
Reply to
David Weinshenker
Ray: The only special cert requirement for contest cert is that they will more generally available....
4.9 Contest Approval
NAR Contest Approval shall be granted only to model rocket motors that are currently and readily available commercially,
and that also meet the requirements of Rule 4.1 through Rule 4.8.
shockie B)
requirements?
Reply to
shockwaveriderz
bob: where does it say that for a model rocket engine to be NAR contest certified it has to be certified as such by only the NAR. The only requirement that I can find for contest cert is this:
4.9 Contest Approval
NAR Contest Approval shall be granted only to model rocket motors that are currently and readily available commercially,
and that also meet the requirements of Rule 4.1 through Rule 4.8.
4.4 Certification
All motors used in a model rocket in NAR sanctioned competition, or for the purpose of establishing a United States Model
Rocket Performance Record, shall be of a type currently holding NAR Contest Approval. No model rocket motor shall be
flown at any NAR Sanctioned activity unless that motor holds current NAR Certification.
It seem by this language that All the NAR has to do is say they are Contest Approved....
shockie B)
formatting link
Reply to
shockwaveriderz
I think the idea is to prevent someone from gaining an advantage by using motors that others in the event wouldn't be able to procure. (For example, suppose someone had a stash of the Apogee "mini" motors left over from when they were available...)
-dave w
Reply to
David Weinshenker

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