12 volt power source?

On Fri, 28 Dec 2007 19:38:15 -0500, I said, "Pick a card, any card"


Nope. Highest capacity is right. I don't have to make sense to you.

In a car, it's both a regulator and a switch. Automatic. You don't have to go and look for the On/Off thingie. Ok?

Well, trying to explain how a refrigerator works to a buffalo is just as hard as trying to explain to you how an automotive voltage regulator works. Can't be done. No worries. Even if you knew all about it and I gave you a roadmap, you'd not find it.

Clearly. Don't worry. Tis all magical. Magic is how everything works. Don't break the side of your car battery or the magic will leak out.

Your TV, DVD player, VCR, furnace thermostat, all of your remotes, your stereo, your refrigerator, your DCC encoder, your air conditioner controller . . .
I could go on. -- Ray
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ray Haddad wrote:

O.K., You say capacity is the correct term. What is the measurement unit for that capacity?

O.K., What's YOUR definition of a 'switch'? Physical disconnect?, or 'High Impedance but still connected?, or possibly something else?

I won't bother, till you describe something that could possibly be there to find. Ok?

You don't need to explain something that basic! Either the "Old way" (electro-mechanical), or the present day (Self regulated Alternator).

ROFLMAO Good one Ray, you do have a sense of humor after all!!

(1)
Ok, forgot that one (2)

Forgot that one too (3) > furnace thermostat, (4) > all of your remotes, (5) + I forgot one (6)

> your air conditioner controller Nope, Window units use a thermocouple tube > and . . . Kitchen range (cook stove) maybe (9), Clothes dryer maybe (10), dead cell-phone (11), 2 cordless phones (+4)

Please do, since we've now covered all my 'Hi Tech' household possession.
Yeah 15 IS more than a dozen, but still in the ballpark, and I have included some things that probably don't have FPGAs in them.
Maybe we should be sure that I'm understanding your use of FPGA correctly. I understood FPGA to be Field programmable Grid Arrays.
Chuck D.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 29 Dec 2007 10:19:59 -0500, I said, "Pick a card, any card"

Give it a rest. Go study something else. -- Ray
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ray Haddad wrote:

What's this?? FOG instead of a useful answer?
Chuck D.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 29 Dec 2007 16:26:57 -0500, I said, "Pick a card, any card"

It's pretty clear that you have no idea of the subject so why bother. Go pester someone else for a while. I'm truly done with you. -- Ray
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/29/2007 7:19 AM Charles Davis spake thus:

Field-programmable *gate* arrays. Dunno what a "grid" would be in this context.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Nebenzahl wrote:

Yeah, that does in fact make more sense. I was in fact puzzled at the time, having been thinking FPLAs, and realizing that wasn't what Ray had said. [FPLAs being Field Programmable Logic Arrays -- Useful in prototype electronics, usually being replaced by 'custom chips' for production (consumer) units.]
Chuck D.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ray Haddad wrote:

The battery is wired directly into the secondary side of the automobile's electrical circuit. If any part of the circuit beyond the alternator/regulator is at 13.8 volts then the battery is at 13.8 volts. (give or take the fractional voltages caused by resistances within the wiring) After starting, the battery could be down as low as 10.5 volts. The rest of the secondary side circuitry will also be down at battery voltage because there is nothing in normal car wiring that disconnects the battery.

There is _nothing_ in normal car wiring that seperates the battery from anything but the alternator - therefore _all_ wiring beyond the regulator is at battery voltage. (ignoring subsequent voltage regulation for electronic equipment and the small internal resistances of the battery and wiring.
Greg.P.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I see that this topic is still CURRENT! <g>
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill wrote:

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
It's quite a DRAIN!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ray Haddad wrote:

Not in any of the cars that I have had over the years Ray.
Unless you are saying that by supplying all the power need to operate the car, AND some extra to charge the battery, there is some magical "Firewall" between those parts of the system.
Chuck
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Nebenzahl wrote:

There _are_ regulated power supplies out there. However the act of regulating requires heat sinking which is difficult to arrange in a small sealed black plastic box. Unless the item to be powered has a very small current draw, or unless it has for some reason to be smaller than the power supply, the regulation will normally be in the powered appliance.
I have old portable computer P/Ss that have the regulation in the P/S.
Regards, Greg.P.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ray Haddad wrote:

I've used computers and PCs for layout operation for years.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Klaus D. Mikkelsen" wrote:

13.8 volts isn't the voltage of an automotive battery charger, it is the maximum voltage an automotive battery will hold. An (decent) automotive battery charger is normally several volts higher. (circa 16 volts DC)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 22 Dec 2007 10:08:19 +1300, I said, "Pick a card, any card"

Go and measure you car battery. It's only 12 volts. If your charger didn't output 13.8 volts or more, it would discharge the battery. That's the nature of lead-acid batteries. No kidding, Greg. I'm really trying to educate you here. Just accept it for now and verify it when you get a chance. Ask a lead-acid battery manufacturer. Go to Jaycar or your local battery shop. Anywhere at all except inside your own head. -- Ray
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ray Haddad wrote:

Perhaps Australian batteries have a lower voltage than the rest of the world.
BTW - I started in electronics at much the same time you did, built mr controllers in the 1960s, first computer from Electronics Australia 1978/9, electric cars mid 1970s ...
Regards, Greg.P.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 22 Dec 2007 14:36:46 +1300, I said, "Pick a card, any card"

Lead-acid batteries are 2 volts per cell. World wide. Go measure yours again without the car running.

Definitely not the same as I did, Greg. If so, you'd know about lead-acid batteries, chargers and power supplies. -- Ray
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ray Haddad wrote:

well, I just measured 4 Australian batteries with 3 different meters, and all measurements were at least 12.5 volts - which is as I would expect from the basic electrochemistry of lead-acid cells.
Tell me, Ray, what do YOU think the exact potential is across a standard individual lead-acid cell? Are you trying to tell us it is exactly 2.00 volts?
You might like to look at some actual data at http://www.buchanan1.net/lead_acid.shtml although you probably wouldn't like to, because it would show you the facts.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 22 Dec 2007 15:11:22 +1100, I said, "Pick a card, any card"
instead replied:

Yes? And?

I'm not going to quibble over a half volt. I'll leave that to the rivet counters out there. The battery is still a 12 volt battery not a 13.8 volt battery. That's close enough. If you want to continue this, go right ahead.

I'm right. You're right. So what? The point is already lost. There is no such thing as a 13.8 volt lead-acid battery. The difference of half volt variance is silly to argue over. But do press on if it amuses you. Greg will be along to huff and puff and pretend he never stated his batteries were all 13.8 volts. -- Ray
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ray Haddad wrote:

"_All_" is irrelevant! Where electronics (or Tortoises running too fast) are concerned, the _maximum_ voltage likely to be met is the relevant figure.
I know you have to disprove everything I say, Ray, but this is getting well out of hand.
Regards, Greg.P.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.