12 volt power source?

On Tue, 25 Dec 2007 19:44:45 -0500, I said, "Pick a card, any card" and Charles Davis instead replied:
I've done both. The battery under charge has a floating voltage of 13.8 volts not from the battery but from the charging circuit. After the charging circuit is removed, the battery is at 12 volts. Anything else is just plain nonsense. -- Ray
Reply to
Ray Haddad
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Right!!! And I'm just hallucinating about the engine still operating. Nice to be told that after all these years.
Yup, strictly a matter of interpretation of 'short'.
Come on now Ray, SHOULD, doesn't cut it. It's easy to say 'Should' and then blame the other person for not being able to find something. If it's there, what are we to look for, a relay?, a circuit board with diodes and other components? I'd really like to know just what this nebulous thing should be made up of.
Chuck D.
Reply to
Charles Davis
On Tue, 25 Dec 2007 19:55:49 -0500, I said, "Pick a card, any card" and Charles Davis instead replied:
Give it a rest, mate. Go look in your shop manual. Ok? Get back to me when you can help yourself. Are you still in diapers or something? Do you need this much help eating your din-din? -- Ray
Reply to
Ray Haddad
Well gee, you can't tell me what to look for???
Why am I not surprised!!! [Because there ain't no such thing there!!!
Chuck D.
Reply to
Charles Davis
Are you saying the battery in a normal automobile has no function other than when the engine is turned off?
I've certainly had enough of it!
Reply to
Greg Procter
Awww Ray, if the electrical circuitry of the car is at 13.8 volts then the battery is at 13.8 volts - it's a physics thing.
I do hope you mean _to_ too high a level? If you charge a battery it has to rise through every voltage point from start to ...
It's best not to overcharge those either - however, they still have to be charged from their starting point through every voltage point to overcharge.
I've just put aside the idea of building a car from scratch and am looking for something like the Daihatsu Mira. There's not enough years left!
Reply to
Greg Procter
On Wed, 26 Dec 2007 14:59:27 +1300, I said, "Pick a card, any card" and Greg Procter instead replied:
No, it's not. When you remove the 13.8 volt source, which is NOT the battery, the battery remains at 12 volts. Period.
No, Greg. If you were to say use 20 volts to charge, that would be too high a level. There's no way to charge a 12 volt battery to any old voltage you choose. Even 13.8 volts is impossible. Thus, when the charge voltage is removed, the battery is at 12 volts. No more than that or just barely above it. Certainly that battery will never be charged to 20 volts or even 13.8 volts. You're grasping at straws now, Greg.
Lead-acid batteries are nearly impossible to overcharge but if you apply to high a float potential you will get gassing or outgassing.
I decided to make it rear wheel drive with the entire front compartment reserved for batteries. I'm experimenting with the fuel cells. Two motors on the rear and all the power and most of the mass up front. Since the mass is all between the axles front to back, that will make it a very stable vehicle. Small, but stable.
What did you think of the fuel cells? -- Ray
Reply to
Ray Haddad
On Wed, 26 Dec 2007 14:49:22 +1300, I said, "Pick a card, any card" and Greg Procter instead replied:
It sure doesn't appear that you mean this.
So, do you build your own switches? -- Ray
Reply to
Ray Haddad
On Tue, 25 Dec 2007 20:15:48 -0500, I said, "Pick a card, any card" and Charles Davis instead replied:
Good grief, Charles. What kind of moron asks a question like this about something I cannot possibly see? That's a bit like asking you to tell me where my barbecue is standing when you have no idea what my house looks like. I'm sure you believe in barbecues so there shouldn't be any question of fact about that.
Your voltage regulator may be in the engine compartment on your car. It may be under the dashboard. It could be part of your car computer. The fact that it exists doesn't mean that you automatically know about it, Charles. After all, do you know what an FPGA is? They exist but I doubt you could find any of the 30 or so that are more than likely scattered around your house at this very moment. -- Ray
Reply to
Ray Haddad
We will just have to agree to differ on that point - all my multimeters agree with me.
Basic Ohms law here: Input voltage (minus voltage sources in circuit) / resistance = current flow. 13.8v+ / resistance = excessive current.
That's the voltage my cite claims is possible. Even your cite said 13.2 volts+.
That doesn't agree with reality.
If the charge level is less than 12 volts you won't find 12 volts across the terminals.
Just barely above it?? 12.5? 13? 13.2?
13.8 volts is the (safe) limit.
I'm still holding the same straws I started with.
That has to do with resistance/current flow.
I was designing a minimal two in-line seat 4 wheel vehicle to minimise wind and rolling resistance. Building and certifying such a vehicle could be a long process. I now have to start over with an existing vehicle and extrapolate everything I've done so far.
I still have to get to that, rellies here until an hour ago. However it has to be something I can obtain here, at a workable cost.
Reply to
Greg Procter
As in turnouts?
That will have to be a yes/no answer. I have built my own in the past and have modified proprietry ones. My two current HO layouts use Peco: - shunting layout code 100 with nothing standard. - my main layout has Peco Code 75, again all modified. I started with ME code 70 track and hand-made turnouts but decided proprietry turnouts were quicker. - I'm currently tooling up to produce NZR 45mm gauge turnouts. (by alternative scale :-)
Reply to
Greg Procter
On Wed, 26 Dec 2007 16:24:00 +1300, I said, "Pick a card, any card" and Greg Procter instead replied:
Well, yes.
I did sort of the same thing but in N-Scale. I used the Athabasca brass turnout to build one left and one right. Had to use stripped down flex track because finding a source of extruded rail was impossible. To be honest, the benefits of doing them by hand was only mental. I did relax during the work but there wasn't anything special about them as far as operationally. Thus, for me, the manufacturer's turnouts are easier.
I'd like to find a source of extruded metal on a roll for G-Scale track. Oh, yeah! Those lovely Australian hardwoods are just begging to become rail ties. Begging. -- Ray
Reply to
Ray Haddad
On Wed, 26 Dec 2007 16:18:50 +1300, I said, "Pick a card, any card" and Greg Procter instead replied:
Ohms law in an active circuit? Oh, dear. -- Ray
Reply to
Ray Haddad
The advantage I was initially going for was more correct sleeper size and spacing than Peco makes. (era and prototype) I finally decided the difference would be minimal.
Well, err, it's not exactly flexible to a managable roll size! Getting it straight again would require rollers.
Right now I'm milling PVC.
Reply to
Greg Procter
On Wed, 26 Dec 2007 16:54:07 +1300, I said, "Pick a card, any card" and Greg Procter instead replied:
Big rolls. Really big rolls.
That doesn't conduct very well for rail use. -- Ray
Reply to
Ray Haddad
Well, if you've got really big money just get a die made and have it produced! I'd consider buying say code 215 in nickel silver.
Err no, I'm buying expensive NS rail locally. I don't need very much to produce turnouts.
Reply to
Greg Procter
[...]
Micro Engineering makes Code 40/55/70/83/100, "weathered" (brown) and non-weathered n/s. Code 40, 55 are right for N, code 70 is OK.
Peco makes code 60/75/80 n/s. Code 50 is right for N, 75 is OK, 80 matches standard sectional N track by Peco, Atlas and others.
Micro Engineering: code 125, 148, 205, 250 n/s, and 250, 332 in aluminum.
Peco: code 250 brass
Code 250 and up will work nicely for G, but code 148 and 205 would look better IMO. But most G wheels have flanges that too deep for this rail.
HTH
Reply to
Wolf K.
And your point is?????
Surely by this time it's dawned on you that Peco doesn't sell the same products in all markets.
Reply to
Wolf K.
Peco sells it's products world-wide. If you demand product 'xyz' they will sell it to you. It's the importer who decides which of Peco's products they will stock, based on perceived demand. I've just gone through the procedure of telling the NZ importer of Peco that they should stock the G guage range. I buy my HO code 75 from Britain.
Regards, Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg Procter

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