Restarting an Unused HO Engine

I thought I try the Subject engine on the tracks, but there's no movemen. A hum comes from the engine and the voltage across the track
goes from 0 to 14 dc as I turn the transformer dial. It's been about 4 years since I took the engine out for a track run. I vaguely recall that some application of oil on the wheels or engine got it going. Possibly it needs some steel wool work on the tracks. Comments?
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I wouldn't use steel wool. The motor will pick up the fragments. If you don't have any kind of track cleaner, you could use a bit of alcohol or an eraser, or a piece of masonite or wood to clean the track. Rub your fingers on the rail to determine if it's dirty.
Bill
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Not knowing anything about the engine I will throw a few things out that may or may not be helpful.
If it is an older engine it may be powered by rubber bands which have long since decinergated(sp?). Take the top off the engine and see if the motor is moving at all. It may be moving but without the rubber bands it can't turn the wheels.
If it doesn't need rubber bands it may just have some crud in the armature that needs cleaning out.
Another thought I had was: is it a European made engine that needs 220 to run on? I have a couple of them and have not even tried to set it up here in the states.
Karl
W. eWatson wrote:

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Karl P Anderson wrote:

I think this is all American made. I bought it 22 years ago for my kids, and am about to sell it. I used sand paper on the tracks, and wheels. I think it was most effective on the tracks. Founde the exploded view of the engine. The engine has looped about 30' of track several times now. It's a two level system, and I suspect it needs more work to pull cars up the incline. Progress anyway.
I may need to look inside the engine, and oil (light?) as necessary. More work on the tracks will probably help too. I think the engine is Athern. Yes, EMD SD-9. Cars too.
The incline is worse than I thought. I have the layout supported on an incline temporarily. I guess it still has some go!
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On Wed, 12 Aug 2009 15:31:53 -0700, "W. eWatson"

The bands referred to are often used on the insulated, traction side of the driver wheels themselves. Look for a groove cut in the wheel where the bands would normally be. If the wheels themselves are smooth then they probably don't need the rubber traction bands.
Use a gray eraser on the tracks, one that has grit in it for typing erasure. That will clean the tracks and leave only minimal debris but nothing that will cause any harm to the engine. Use another eraser type, the gum eraser, to clean your armature on the motor after you disassemble it - should you decide to do that. The gum eraser won't scratch it.
If your brushes need replacing from wear or deterioration, you will either have to buy them or make new ones. Not that hard, actually. If your armature is gouged, it may need resurfacing by a machinist.
Good luck with the engine. -- Ray
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wrote:

If it needs resurfacing by a machinist, it would be cheaper to just sell 'as is'. I doubt a 22 year old Athearn SD-9 would be worth the cost.
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wrote:

The repair could be a labor of love rather than one of dollar value. -- Ray
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The OP wants to Sell it.
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wrote:

That came up later. His original post said nothing about selling it. -- Ray
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Even if it did, who in their right mind would get an armature resurfaced by a machinist when you could buy a DCC equipped loco for the same price or stick in a new motor for a lot less!
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wrote:

I have my own milling machine. Deal. -- Ray
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That's not "getting the armature resurfaced by a machinist", that's doing it yourself. Even if you are a machinist.
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wrote:

So what? You wouldn't do it. Others might. It remains an option even though you don't like it. What's your problem here? Do you really feel such an overwhelming need to "win" on this issue? A resurfacing of the armature on a miniature engine is really not that costly.
But then, you will never know. -- Ray
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Have a nice day, Ray. Be sure to get the last word in.
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On 8/13/2009 6:13 PM Ray Haddad spake thus:

Before this thread gets out of hand and turns into yet another pissing match (curious how many threads in which R. Haddad participates go that way), it should be pointed out that a loco commutator needing machining is, once again, probably the wrong prescription. For a loco that's been run hard and long, maybe. One that's basically been stored away for 20+ years? Believe me, the commutator does *not* need machining, either by oneself or by a professional.
Deal.
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

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Agreed. Lets look at the simple logical things first, the ones that are known to go bad with an Athearn loco. Things like a broken gear or lack of lubrication!
-- Bob May
rmay at nethere.com http: slash /nav.to slash bobmay http: slash /bobmay dot astronomy.net
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wrote:

That was a last resort. You guys are so intent on making yourselves the authorities on everything that nobody else can even offer a solution. Read what I wrote again if you have to. -- Ray
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On 8/13/2009 11:28 PM Ray Haddad spake thus:

OK, let's look at what you wrote:

Of course, it turns out that the OP's loco doesn't have traction tires, as I had guessed, so this isn't helpful.

Not what I would have chosen, but should work; fair enough.

Brush wear is unlikely to be an issue for a loco which was evidently little used and then stored, let alone a "gouged" commutator (what you meant type instead of "armature"), so again not helpful.
So you gave one small piece of helpful advice.
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

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Who is his usual foil? I was knee deep in the big muddy when I realized pushing on was senseless.
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LD wrote:.

...
Where is Greg Procter when we need him to debate with Mr Haddad?
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