Ultrasonic cleaner pinholes

A friend has gifted me a little 100W ultrasonic cleaner (typical Chinese) that he was using to clean brass for reloads.
The cleaning solution (salt, vinegar, dish soap, water) seems to have created pinholes, probably where there were inclusions near the deepest drawn section.
Could this be painted with epoxy paint? Or should I try to TIG a thin SS sheet over the bottom tacking it at a few spots to keep it moving?
--Spehro Pefhany
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I welded a rust pit leak in a thin stainless (-ish) kettle by backing the hole with copper. I probably could have done a neater job with a torch and silver solder but I wanted the TIG practice.
-jsw
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On Thursday, 14 February 2019 17:35:21 UTC-5, Jim Wilkins wrote:

Thanks, backing it with copper is a good idea.
--Spehro Pefhany
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wrote:

Greetings Spehro, Years ago my mom asked me to weld repair a hole in a stainless bowl. The bowl could have been replaced with a similar one for 20 or 30 bucks but it was one she used all the time for cooking and since I could weld and had a fancy TIG machine and a machine shop, and it was my mom after all, I said sure. When I started welding the stainless started to kind of vaporize. My welder has a 1 to 10 amp range and I turned the starting current way down but the pinhole just kept getting bigger. The metal had started to corrode between the inside and outside of the bowl so there were two layers with corrosion products in between. I ended up using a .125 diameter carbide burr to remove the corroded area the result of which was a hole about 3/8 in diameter. Then carefully closed up the hole by welding around the edges of the hole until the bowl was solid again. After using coarse sanding discs on the right angle die grinder to smooth out the welded area and bring the metal back to the original thickness I switched to finer sanding discs and then to scotch-brite discs so that the welded area looked like the rest of the bowl, only shinier. I told my mom it was a quick job. She still uses that bowl and it's been about 20 years since I fixed it. Anyway, be prepared for corrosion like I saw. Another poster mentioned copper backing, which is a good idea. Eric
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On Thu, 14 Feb 2019 12:55:00 -0800 (PST)

I would try putting a blob of RTV Silicon on the backside and see what happens. Providing of course you can get to the back...
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI
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On Thursday, February 14, 2019 at 3:55:02 PM UTC-5, speff wrote:

Stainless steel will corrode in stale salt water. If the water has oxygen in it, no problem
I would coat with epoxy and start looking for a SS container to replace the original.. and store the cleaning solution in a separate container when not using the cleaner.
Dan
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On Friday, February 15, 2019 at 1:55:36 PM UTC-8, snipped-for-privacy@krl.org wrote:

The container is cemented to the ultrasound transducer; it's worth welding/hardsoldering to repair it.
Cleaning solutions that aren't compatible with stainless should go into a plastic cup, and lower the cup into the water bath to do the ultrasound. I use oxalic acid for some cleaning (rust stains) and it's totally nasty if you let it touch stainless.
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